A Different Perspective for Athletes to Consider: Don’t Ice for Recovery

A Different Perspective for Athletes to Consider: Don’t Ice for Recovery

gary-reinlDistance runner Gary Reinl’s meticulous reporting destroyed the long-held practice of rest and ice for healing injuries, restoring the natural course of healing by the inflammatory response assisted by muscle activation – the intuitive “walk it off” order of coaches in his childhood. His insistence on scientific evidence also makes him a user and advocate of The Right Stuff hydration formula developed by NASA.

Reinl, 63, who started running in the 1960s on water and sometimes salt tablets, remembers a nearly 70-mile run from Philadelphia to Ocean City, N.J., in the summer of 1971 wearing Converse sneakers and sipping water from front-yard hoses on the route.

“Everything we did was wrong,” he says. “I’ve done it wrong, and I’ve done it right, and I’m certain that doing it right is way better.”

icedWhen it comes to treating injuries, doing it right is the opposite of conventional wisdom that held sway for decades under the popular acronym RICE – Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Reinl’s relentless research found support for the approach, and Dr. Gabe Mirkin, who coined the term in 1978, recanted in the foreword to Reinl’s 2014 book Iced! The Illusionary Treatment Option.

Shifting the Conversation

“We have begun to shift the conversation. We’re shifting it to muscle activation to solve the problem,” says Reinl, who represents an electro-muscle stimulation device, MARC PRO® (Muscle Activated Recovery Cascade), that promotes muscle activation. “Why would you put ice on damaged tissue? People believe it reduces swelling. It doesn’t reduce swelling. It actually increases swelling. Your immune system knows how to handle it. That’s why it sends fluid to the damaged area. Why would you try to reduce the amount of fluid sent to the damaged site?”

Ice slows the natural repair process by shutting off signals between muscles and nerves. Inflammation is a necessary part of the healing process as the body rushes blood and nutrients to the area, and muscle activation helps flush out the extra fluids through the lymphatic system. “The last thing you’d want to do is restrict swelling coming to the area,” Reinl says. “You do want the fluid to come. What you don’t want it to do is accumulate and settle.”

In fact, the delay caused by icing can suffocate healthy cells that would not have died as a result of the injury, a secondary cellular death that Reinl calls “negligent homicide.”

Reinl traced the origins of the “Ice Age” to 1962, when a physician successfully reattached the arm, preserved on ice, of a 12-year-old who was injured while jumping a train in Massachusetts. The story became a sensation, and people mistakenly associated ice with healing. “The intent of putting the severed body arm on ice was to preserve the severed body part,” he explains. “It had nothing to do with damaged tissue; it had to do with managing a severed body part.”

The RICE Approach

riceAfter Mirkin published his RICE approach in 1978, soccer moms everywhere kept nifty snap-and-chill ice packs in their pocketbooks. Athletic trainers, who became common on sports teams in the 1980s, could not perform medical procedures but could legally apply ice. Even after Medicare, recognizing the lack of evidence, stopped reimbursing for ice treatments in physical therapy clinics, the practice thrived in sports.

Reinl has worked with athletic trainers and physical therapists from more than 80 professional teams and other elite athletes who have stopped or reduced their use of ice, although some star athletes still insist on the old approach.

These days, Reinl, whose lifetime running total is above 50,000 miles, lives in the Las Vegas desert and routinely runs 10 miles through a canyon where temperatures can exceed 113 degrees. He preps with a pre-run dose of The Right Stuff and takes another packet for each hour on the road when he returns, ensuring that his body chemistry remains optimal for tissue regeneration and recovery.

“You know how good you feel from it,” he says, adding that his son, a lawyer, rejects all otherright-stuff supplements but adopts The Right Stuff regimen. “I can go out and run 20 in the desert and I’m perfectly fine. I carry a couple of gallons of water with me. I stay fully hydrated on my runs.”

He recommends The Right Stuff to runners, endurance athletes, military personnel, and even golfers who spend long hours in the hot sun. You can check out the science behind The Right Stuff.        [Editors Note: links to NASA studies can be found on the brand’s website at http://tiny.cc/TheRightStuffStudies]

“Any elites I talk to, I say just look around and look at how people are trying to solve the problem,” Reinl says. “Look at the science behind The Right Stuff.  It improves muscle function. It improves your physiology. It improves muscle activation. It feels good. Every edge counts.”

 

Sportscar Racer Shares His Success Formula

Sportscar Racer Shares His Success Formula

dave-goreeDave Goree’s father sold his race car when Dave was born but quickly returned to the sport – the two were working on race cars by the time Dave was 14. “I fell in love with it and wanted to drive,” Goree says “It was difficult for me to get into sports car racing. I got into motorcycle racing. I’ve been back and forth between motorcycles and cars several times since then.”

In his 35 years in motorsports, he has won races and/or championships in every category except Indy Lights. He has also seen vast improvements in safety in the sport – from losing a driver every year or two in the past to intense focus on preventive improvements in the rare event of a fatal accident.

An ordinary highway accident in 2011 damaged Goree’s lower back, a worse injury than any he has suffered on the high-speed track, but he expects to drive again this season. “We’re building a Sprint car for me to drive and probably another one for an assortment of my friends to drive,” he says.

Starting His Own Team

Goree was chief engineer for an Indy Lights team when the indy lights croppedeconomy soured and the team disbanded in 2009. He started his own team and competed on a shoestring – carpooling with another team to a race in Canada, borrowing a Formula SAE team from a local college, and running an extension cord from the friendly team parked next door. The group stayed up all night making repairs after an accident on Saturday and placed 10th in the race on Sunday.

His Goree Multisports is mostly motorsports but includes bicycle racing and hopes to include equestrian competition. Outsiders sometimes fail to realize the high-level athleticism, both mental and physical, required for successful race car driving, Goree says.

Formula car drivers are athletes.

“Formula car drivers are athletes. The physical demands those cars put on you is hard for people who have never driven one to imagine,” he says, listing g-forces and the hard-to-turn non-power steering. “You’re operating near your physical limits, and it’s such a mental game. Racing is 90 percent inside your head. It’s about ultra-precision – being that controlled operating at mental and physical maximum. It requires that your brain is perfectly hydrated.” [Editor’s note: Race cars do not have air conditioning.  Temperatures in the cabins often exceed of 120°F, significantly increasing the risk of driver dehydration which impacts their respond times needed at such high speeds]

That’s why Goree uses OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Right Stuff –  he’s seen how it helps drivers maintain focus and avoid cramping that can impair driving in the heat of a race.

“In my experience watching drivers, using The Right Stuff vs. when they don’t, especially near the end of the race – you can tell the difference during those the money laps,” he says.

[Editor’s note: For more information about The Right Stuff® from NASA visit www.TheRightStuff-USA.com]
Decades of Competing in Endurance Races Equals Many Years of Success

Decades of Competing in Endurance Races Equals Many Years of Success

greer 2Mike Greer, who grew up running track and playing football near Lubbock, Tex., was a heavy-sweating athlete long before anyone invented electrolyte-replacement sports drinks. “I wonder how any of us even lived,” he says. “They wouldn’t allow us to hydrate during workouts or after workouts sometimes.”

Today, at age 76, with 44 marathons and 369 triathlons (so far) on his resume

Greer has adopted The Right Stuff to keep himself hydrated, and he recommends the product to others who come to him for motivation and participate in his events. His BSLT Triathlon Inc., which organizes 10 triathlons and other races each year, held its BSLT Logo26th annual Ironman 70.3 Buffalo Springs Lake east of Lubbock in June.

Greer’s long story, with chapters still being written, has health at the heart and touches a host of family, education, business, and hobby experiences.

After high school, he won a full athletic scholarship to the University of Houston, U of Houstontransferred to the University of Texas at Arlington in both sports, and served in the Army for nearly three years, keeping up his fitness and his competitive drive in his career as a sales representative and business owner. Without a UT Arlingtonhigh school or college coach to motivate him, he motivated himself.

Going the Distance

“I maintained my fitness over the years by doing things I could do,” he says. “In the Army, I took up the game of handball. After 12 years of that – sometimes you’ve got to recognize things going on in your body – I decided to go for more aerobic stuff.” He broke a foot during a handball tournament and was suffering frequent pain in both elbows.

Greer’s track events had been the 100-, 200-, and the 400-meter relay in college, and he had stayed away from distance running. But he decided to run a mile one day, and after two weeks, he was running 10 miles. “I wasn’t running very fast, but I was running,” he says. “I liked the feel of it. I started running with the local running club.”

In the mid-1970s, Greer entered his first marathon, near Lubbock, and finished in 4:52 – through a wind chill of 40 below zero and 20 water crossings – placing second when he let a bundled-up competitor pass him in the last quarter-mile. “That was my introduction to endurance running,” he says. “It really charged me. I had the bug.” He cut his time to 4 hours in the next marathon and broke 4 hours in the third. With that start in 1977, he’s run 44 marathons and 65,000 miles. Since he turned to triathlons in 1983, Greer has run 369 and counting. “I want my body to stay in shape,” he says. “The main thing I believe in exercising is the heart muscle.”

The main thing I believe in exercising is the heart muscle.

Greer met David Belaga at the USA Triathlon expo in Colorado and became a representative for The Right Stuff soon after trying the product.

“Being an endurance athlete, I’m always looking for something that’s going to help with leg cramps, help me prevent dehydration,” he says. ‘It was designed to do that for very important people – when you go in a spaceship and you go off the planet, you’re going to be naturally dehydrated. They designed it for them, but endurance athletes dehydrate a lot too. 4 flavors V_comp wh bkgrndThe Right Stuff is so far ahead of what’s out there from a hydration standpoint. Rather than dehydrate and do something about it, it gives you the ability to hydrate and stay hydrated and not go into this deficit.”

Greer drinks The Right Stuff in 16 ounces of water when he works up a sweat, such as a few minutes on the bike after swimming in a triathlon. “When you feel a sweat, you start drinking,” he says. “That’s my rule of thumb. Don’t try to slam it.

Your body’s more open to receive The Right Stuff once you’d worked up that sweat in the heat of the workout or the heat of competition. That’s basically how I use the product and recommend people use the product.”

Concentration is Key

The Right Stuff, like dependable bicycle tires and well-stocked water and food stations on the triathlon route, leave him free to concentrate on competing, Greer says. “I know my hydration’s good,” he says. “I don’t have to worry about that. I don’t have to worry about anything but competing. That’s the ultimate for an athlete.”

While pursuing his demanding fitness regime, Greer has also earned the equivalent of a master’s degree in military science and a Ph.D. in psychology; organized eight businesses, including a material handling firm for the cotton industry; stayed in the active reserves for the Army, reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel; written two books; and raised six children. Greer has 13 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. He and his wife Marti are in the USA Triathlon Federation South Midwest Hall of Fame, and she is in the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame for gymnastics.

greer imageGreer advises endurance athletes and others as a certified life coach (greercoach.com), more motivational than technical. “I motivate people to do the sports if they’re interested in being motivated. I’ve motivated lots of athletes who came to me and said ‘what do I do to get started?’” he says. “I give them my formula. It’s not even written down. I tell them, ‘here’s the three stages you’re going to be involved with me. Then get a good coach.’” One woman who took his advice became one of the top ultra-endurance athletes in the world, winning double Ironmans five times in eight years.

In his spare time, Greer rides a Harley-Davidson and studies U.S. presidents. Recently, a remark about Jimmy Carter’s goal-setting inspired him to make a long-range list that will take him to 91. That includes at least 10 events, including three half-marathons, a year, and probably some more Ironman races.

“That’s the way I do my life,” he says. “It’s been a full life up to here, and you know what? It’s not over. During the years, I’ve tried to stay right on the cutting edge. I’ve been able to have a very diversified life.”

Introducing New All-Natural Lemonade The Right Stuff® Hydration from NASA

Introducing New All-Natural Lemonade The Right Stuff® Hydration from NASA

lemonade pouch 10-15New The Right Stuff® Lemonade is a new flavor of the same highly effective NASA-developed, blend of electrolytes, which as always, contains no carbohydrates. This new variety is sweetened with all-natural Stevia and like all the other flavors, is NSF Certified for Sport.

Based on numerous published studies (links can be found here on our website), The Right Stuff is far superior to any other NASA-tested formula for:

  • Combating the cramps, muscle fatigue, light-headedness and headaches caused by heavy sweating, dehydration and electrolyte loss
  • Increasing endurance by over 20% or more than any other NASA-tested formula
  • Improving core thermoregulation;protecting athletes’ bodies from overheating during times of intense exertion and in high heat settings

All versions of The Right Stuff are NSF-Certified for Sport and so are clear from all banned substances, heavy metals and contaminants.

High Schools and Colleges across the U.S., numerous pro teams (NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL and MLS) and Olympians along with first responders (firefighters, military) and industrial workers (construction and paving crews, roofers, parcel delivery etc.) all have integrated The Right Stuff into their training and event-day regimens.

Additionally, the NASA studies show thlemonadeat the formula is also a powerful aid for fighting the negative effects caused by Jet Lag and high altitude

To learn more:

Visit www.TheRightStuff-USA.com

Call 720-684-6584
Or
Click here to visit our Facebook Fan Page

Improving Nutrition Habits for High School, Collegiate and Professional Athletes

Improving Nutrition Habits for High School, Collegiate and Professional Athletes

Tavis PTavis Piattoly, who played football and other sports in high school, dropped 50 pounds in the summer after he graduated, before he enrolled in Louisiana State University as a pre-med student. Now he offers High School and other athletes the expert nutrition he wishes he would have known as a 17-year-old who got used to fast food before practice and Chinese buffet afterwards.

“I wish I’d had the knowledge then that I have now,” Piattoly says. “I wouldn’t have made such bad decisions. There was no one there to tell us.”

NO Saints croppedPiattoly switched his major to dietetics with an emphasis on sports nutrition and achieved his goal of working with the New Orleans Saints, for seven years. He’s worked 12 years with Tulane University and now operates his own My Sports Dietitian (www.mysportsd.com), an online education and software platform for athletes, parents, coaches, athletic trainers, and coaches that offers phone apps for tracking nutrition, one-on-one counseling for athletes, and a mentorship program for young sports nutrition students and practitioners.

Logo Tulane croppedSince he started at Tulane in 2003, Piattoly has seen rapid growth in staff Sports Dietitians in Division 1 schools, now totaling about 75. He believes the focus is spreading to the 8 million high school athletes and their parents who are seeking safer and more effective performance.

Focus on When and What You Eat

“You can change behavior more with a 14-year-old than a 28-year-old,” says Piattoly, who starts with a focus on when the athlete eats and then focuses on what they eat. “Now we know nutrition can give athletes a performance advantage if they time their intake correctly. High school athletes are underfueling their bodies to support their activity. Nutrition can make a good athlete great – or a great athlete good.”

Athletes who train five hours a day, maybe in two different sports, should eat about every three hours, he says. When Piattoly advises an athlete, he starts with a three-day food log to be sure they’re not energy-deprived – then starts replacing the breakfast doughnuts or toaster pastries with shakes, eggs, and oatmeal.

It all starts with timing. That’s the first nutritional strategy I employ.

“It all starts with timing,” he says. “That’s the first nutritional strategy I employ. If we can fix the ‘when,’ we can fix the ‘what.’ Ninety percent of the kids I work with are highly motivated. They realize nutrition is the piece they’ve been missing all along. Parents are a critical piece, especially Moms. Mom is usually the food provider for the athlete, or sometimes it’s a single dad.”

Piattoly helped a small-framed high school linebacker gain 50 pounds by his senior year and earn a college scholarship. He worked with a high school quarterback to add 20 pounds of lean muscle so he could attract college scouts.

“It’s all about teaching them to get enough calories to support what they’re trying to do,” he says. “It’s the missing component, it’s the secret weapon, it’s the component that leads to success in everything else.”

The food-first approach incorporates supplementation where appropriate, including The Right Stuff for heavy-sweating athletes and those susceptible to cramps. “In the New Orleans area, it’s really humid,” Piattoly says. “We use The Right Stuff with a lot of our athletes that are heavy sweaters. It’s good for any athlete. We get a lot of sodium in our diet, but when we sweat it out at accelerated rates, we need to replenish it. Our body needs it.”

Interest in nutrition is expanding to younger ages because it both helps prevent injury and enhances performance. “We’re going to see this field continue to expand throughout the collegiate level, high school, club teams,” Piattoly says. “It’s going to trickle down, just like athletic trainers did in the past”

NHL Head Athletic Trainer shares the solution to hydration challenges even in the cold of the hockey rink

NHL Head Athletic Trainer shares the solution to hydration challenges even in the cold of the hockey rink

Like any hockey player growing up in the Detroit area, Piet Van Zant dreamed of playing with the National Hockey League (NHL) Detroit Red Wings. An injury that sidelined him in high school put him on a career path that led to the Red Wings organization more 20 years ago. He’s now the Head Athletic Trainer.Piet Van Zant

“You want to play for your hometown team,” says Van Zant, who was introduced to athletic training after his injury. “Once I started in the program, it was definitely something I knew I wanted to do as a career.”

After he graduated from Central Michigan University with a bachelor’s degree in athletic training in 1993, Van Zant went to work for the minor league Adirondack Red Wings. After six years, he was added to the Detroit Red Wings medical staff as an Assistant Trainer, and he became Head Trainer in 2002. He earned a master’s degree in Performance Enhancement in 2004 just as emphasis on sports training and nutrition was accelerating.

Boosting health, safety, and performance

“Over the years, it’s definitely become a more evidence-based practice for athletic trainers and anybody in the medical field when it comes to pro sports and pro athletes,” Van Zant says. “You need to have research and proof that your treatments and your therapies you’re doing with athletes actually work.”

Red Wings HockeySince Van Zant joined the Red Wings, the organization has added a nutritionist, strength coach, a physical therapist, and two massage therapists, with access for players to acupuncture, chiropractic, and other strategies to boost their health, safety, and performance. The Nutritionist introduced him to The Right Stuff a few years ago.

Hydration is imperative in sports like hockey

“It started with a couple of problem players, and it’s evolved to a preventive strategy for multiple players,” he says. “Hydration is imperative in sports like hockey where you’re wearing equipment that weighs you down, that increases the heat. Your body’s not able to dissipate that heat as well as if you were in shorts and a t-shirt.”

Despite an environment cold enough to keep the rink frozen, Hi Res Hockey Goalie croppedthe intensity and length of hockey events – some 3½ hours – in heavy equipment can cause sweating that disrupts sodium and electrolyte balance. In one extreme case, Van Zant say, a goalie lost 15 pounds in a single game.

Just plain water over that time frame isn’t going to cut it,” he says. “It is crucial to maintain that balance. The Right Stuff helps us do that.”

Serious Cramper, Adventure Racer, shares his NASA-developed solution

Serious Cramper, Adventure Racer, shares his NASA-developed solution

Barry Nobles 2014-Barry-Nobles-Profile-Photo-300x225considers himself a nerd at work and at play. He works on legislation and strategic planning at the Coast Guard headquarters in Washington, D.C. In his spare time, he’s into Adventure Racing. [Editors Note: Adventure Racing is one of the faster growing endurance sports in the US with over 50,000 competitors annually leading up to National Championships]

What is Adventure Racing?

usara2“It’s kind of this nerdy cross section of the sports world,” Nobles explains. “It’s kind of like a triathlon, except you’re on a team and you have a map and a compass. You have to figure your way from checkpoint to checkpoint to checkpoint to checkpoint – on foot, mountain back, paddling, climbing. You’ve got to figure out how to get from place to place.”  [Editors Note: Learn more at USARA – US Adventure Racing Assn.]

Nobles loves the sport but was hampered by cramping, a family condition shared by his sister, father, and grandfather. “I come from a proud line of crampers, he jokes, but his teammates were exasperated by the interruptions every few hours. “Nobody wants a teammate who’s standing there locked up and can’t move. I’d be a liability to my teammates” One teammate recommended The Right Stuff (NASA-developed zero carb, electrolyte drink additive), and Nobles tried it first at a mountain bike race, the Shenandoah Mountain 100.

I started taking The Right Stuff. I made it through the whole race and didn’t cramp once. Now I’m in love with the stuff.

“That was the first time I actually used it for an event,” he says. “I’ve attempted that race three times. The first two times, before I was even halfway there, I completely locked up, around Mile 45. Last year, I started taking The Right Stuff. I made it through the whole race and didn’t cramp once. Now I’m in love with the stuff. I have teammates in love with the stuff, too.”

Nobles uses The Right Stuff at least weekly. “That is my drug of choice,” he says. “If I’m going over an hour, that’s when I use it. I train pretty hard. I’ve been doing a lot of racing lately.” He participated in the Krispy Kreme Challenge, a charity race from the N.C. State University campus to a downtown Raleigh doughnut shop several miles away where runners consume a dozen doughnuts before racing back, all in less than an hour.

Nobles recalls a 24-hour adventure race where a friend cramped and lay on the ground in the woods while others tried to massage his legs. “That’s not a good way to win a race,” he says. “He definitely would benefit from The Right Stuff.”

2010 and 2012 NCAA Football Champion University of Alabama: Nutrition is Critical to Athlete Success!

2010 and 2012 NCAA Football Champion University of Alabama: Nutrition is Critical to Athlete Success!

Amy BraggAmy Bragg was the eighth full-time college sports dietitian in the entire US when she was hired at Texas A&M in 2004, a position created when the Athletic Director came from the pioneer athletic-nutrition focused University of Nebraska. As the profession has mushroomed in the past decade, Bragg, who moved to the University of Alabama Alabama Univ ofin 2010 (Editors Note: In 2011 & 2012 Alabama was the College Football Champion), hopes to see nutrition awareness expand into other fields.

Nutrition is a big, broad concept, beyond sports nutrition,” she says. “It affects every person. It’s something I would like to see grow.”

Bragg credits her interest to a nutrition and foods course she took as a high school senior, taught by a dietitian who was ahead of her time on the subjects of herbs, recipes, and sustainability in the 1990s. “Nobody was really thinking of sustainability in the food supply back then,” Bragg recalls.

Bragg earned a degree in Finance from the University of Texas, where she supported the athletic program as a football hostess, and went on to earn a nutrition and foods degree at the University of Houston. She became a Clinical Dietitian at the Texas Medical Center in Houston in 2001 and also started consulting with athletes about nutrition before she joined Texas A&M. Bragg, one of the founders and past-president of the Collegiate and Professional Sports Dietitians Association (CPSDA), witnessed the early days of the athletic nutrition movement.

Athletic Nutrition Movement

“Back then we were just getting connected, creating a listserv, starting to talk, about a dozen of us networking, going to meetings, running into each other and sharing ideas, how to navigate challenges,” she recalls. “It was slow initially. The growth has really happened, I think, in the last three years. It’s really evolved.”

…when you manage the food supply you get better outcomes, when you manage nutrition rather than just react to it or treat issues medically. You get a much greater benefit for the athletes’ development and their long-term health.

“Those of us who have worked with Athletic Trainers and Strength Coaches for a while have been able to show…when you manage the food supply you get better outcomes, when you manage nutrition rather than just react to it or treat issues medically. You get a much greater benefit for the athletes’ development and their long-term health. It’s an important partnership with the other support staff. Parents and athletes value it. They value nutrition when you talk about it in a recruiting scenario and they value it when they come on campus.”

Athletes often overlook the importance of what they eat for their performance, Bragg says.

“Athletes don’t respond to lectures, and they don’t want to be forced to see a nutritionist,” she says. “They can’t see that they’ll get anything from it because they don’t have a weight problem. It shouldn’t be punitive. For every athlete, it should be about performance, it should be about health. They typically don’t eat well. Getting them to eat better keeps them on the field. You have to get them at the right time. Sometimes it’s when they’re injured. Sometimes they’re doing a rehab and you can affect them more – they’re more responsive. But really it’s for everyone.”

The nutrition plan includes The Right Stuff when needed to protect athletes’ hydration.

“There are occasions and specific athlete needs that require higher sodium intake,” Bragg says. “The Right Stuff is an effective add-on to whatever you’re doing for hydration. In the food plan, for some athletes, The Right Stuff becomes essential for them to perform well throughout an entire game. If you’ve ever had a full-body cramp, you’re responsive to anything that will keep that from happening again.  The Right Stuff is a powerful aid in prevention of cramps. [Editors Note: Studies show the formula also improves core thermoregulation, protecting the body from overheating and increases athletic endurance]

If you’ve ever had a full-body cramp, you’re responsive to anything that will keep that from happening again.

We try to have a full arsenal of things to get athletes through every situation, and The Right Stuff is an important part of that for us.”

Bragg hopes that the athletes’ nutrition education will impact the rest of their lives. “It’s part of their development and their performance and their lifelong health,” she says. “Athletes are going to go on and become parents, and they’re going to develop their children’s nutrition. We’re talking about the big picture.”

To learn more visit www.TheRightStuff-USA.com

NASA-developed Hydration Aid Helping Soldiers in Hot Climates

NASA-developed Hydration Aid Helping Soldiers in Hot Climates

The Right Stuff, NASA-developed electrolyte drink additive was originally created for our astronauts and now used by high-exertion athletes from football players to triathletes, is helping U.S. troops stay strong in high-temperature locations where they are deployed.TRS_LOGO_dbl drop w ™ jpeg

Keeping Our Troops Hydrated

Donations of the product by Colorado-based Wellness Brands Inc. are coordinated through Operation Troop Aid of Tennessee, a decade-old nonprofit committed to providing care packages and bill payment assistance to soldiers of all military branches.

“The Right Stuff is made for such intense athletes,” says Mark Woods, founder of Operation Troop Aid. “These troops are in harm’s way in a very hot environment, so keeping their hydration up is critical to their performance. It makes a lot of sense.”

Woods established Operation Troop Aid after he helped manage the nationally-televised Garth Brooks performance after 9/11 on the U.S.S. Enterprise, where he was stationed.

The organization, which partners with fairs, festivals, shows, and other events, has distributed more than $6 million worth of products. Sponsors range from restaurants and jewelers to radio stations, a popcorn producer, and a chocolatier.

David Belaga, CEO of Wellness Brands, contacted Woods when he heard about the initiative three years ago. Since the first donation, included in care packages, Wellness Brands has shipped The Right Stuff directly to troop stations for distribution to the units.

We’re grateful to Operation Troop Aid for making possible this way to serve and support our troops.

A wide cross-section of athletes from High Schools and Colleges to Pro teams (NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL etc.) and Olympians use The Right Stuff for training and competition.   “Athletes, firefighters, construction workers, and others who do strenuous labor in hot and humid conditions are benefiting from this product.” Belaga says. “We’re grateful to Operation Troop Aid for making possible this way to serve and support our troops.”

The Right Stuff from NASA is a prepackaged, electrolyte, liquid drink additive that goes instantly into solution when added to at least 16 ounces of water. The formula combats cramps, headaches and the other symptoms of dehydration; protects the body from overheating both in times of intense exertion as well as in high heat settings; and increases endurance over 20 percent more than any other NASA-tested formula. Plus, NASA studies show that the formula also offsets the negative effects of jet lag and high altitude.  Learn more at www.TheRightStuff-USA.com

Lynda Best-Wiss, Triathlete and Coach succeeds during Half Iron Man while Surviving 100+ heat with The Right Stuff

Lynda Best-Wiss, Triathlete and Coach succeeds during Half Iron Man while Surviving 100+ heat with The Right Stuff

Linda Best-Wiss has competed in triathlons for some time, but the Buffalo Springs 70.3 Half Ironman really put her to the test.  During the race temperatures rose above 100°F and she thrived by properly dialing in her hydration protocol.  Watch how it worked for her.  She qualified for the Kona Ironman World Championships in Hawaii!

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