Decades of Competing in Endurance Races Equals Many Years of Success

Decades of Competing in Endurance Races Equals Many Years of Success

greer 2Mike Greer, who grew up running track and playing football near Lubbock, Tex., was a heavy-sweating athlete long before anyone invented electrolyte-replacement sports drinks. “I wonder how any of us even lived,” he says. “They wouldn’t allow us to hydrate during workouts or after workouts sometimes.”

Today, at age 76, with 44 marathons and 369 triathlons (so far) on his resume

Greer has adopted The Right Stuff to keep himself hydrated, and he recommends the product to others who come to him for motivation and participate in his events. His BSLT Triathlon Inc., which organizes 10 triathlons and other races each year, held its BSLT Logo26th annual Ironman 70.3 Buffalo Springs Lake east of Lubbock in June.

Greer’s long story, with chapters still being written, has health at the heart and touches a host of family, education, business, and hobby experiences.

After high school, he won a full athletic scholarship to the University of Houston, U of Houstontransferred to the University of Texas at Arlington in both sports, and served in the Army for nearly three years, keeping up his fitness and his competitive drive in his career as a sales representative and business owner. Without a UT Arlingtonhigh school or college coach to motivate him, he motivated himself.

Going the Distance

“I maintained my fitness over the years by doing things I could do,” he says. “In the Army, I took up the game of handball. After 12 years of that – sometimes you’ve got to recognize things going on in your body – I decided to go for more aerobic stuff.” He broke a foot during a handball tournament and was suffering frequent pain in both elbows.

Greer’s track events had been the 100-, 200-, and the 400-meter relay in college, and he had stayed away from distance running. But he decided to run a mile one day, and after two weeks, he was running 10 miles. “I wasn’t running very fast, but I was running,” he says. “I liked the feel of it. I started running with the local running club.”

In the mid-1970s, Greer entered his first marathon, near Lubbock, and finished in 4:52 – through a wind chill of 40 below zero and 20 water crossings – placing second when he let a bundled-up competitor pass him in the last quarter-mile. “That was my introduction to endurance running,” he says. “It really charged me. I had the bug.” He cut his time to 4 hours in the next marathon and broke 4 hours in the third. With that start in 1977, he’s run 44 marathons and 65,000 miles. Since he turned to triathlons in 1983, Greer has run 369 and counting. “I want my body to stay in shape,” he says. “The main thing I believe in exercising is the heart muscle.”

The main thing I believe in exercising is the heart muscle.

Greer met David Belaga at the USA Triathlon expo in Colorado and became a representative for The Right Stuff soon after trying the product.

“Being an endurance athlete, I’m always looking for something that’s going to help with leg cramps, help me prevent dehydration,” he says. ‘It was designed to do that for very important people – when you go in a spaceship and you go off the planet, you’re going to be naturally dehydrated. They designed it for them, but endurance athletes dehydrate a lot too. 4 flavors V_comp wh bkgrndThe Right Stuff is so far ahead of what’s out there from a hydration standpoint. Rather than dehydrate and do something about it, it gives you the ability to hydrate and stay hydrated and not go into this deficit.”

Greer drinks The Right Stuff in 16 ounces of water when he works up a sweat, such as a few minutes on the bike after swimming in a triathlon. “When you feel a sweat, you start drinking,” he says. “That’s my rule of thumb. Don’t try to slam it.

Your body’s more open to receive The Right Stuff once you’d worked up that sweat in the heat of the workout or the heat of competition. That’s basically how I use the product and recommend people use the product.”

Concentration is Key

The Right Stuff, like dependable bicycle tires and well-stocked water and food stations on the triathlon route, leave him free to concentrate on competing, Greer says. “I know my hydration’s good,” he says. “I don’t have to worry about that. I don’t have to worry about anything but competing. That’s the ultimate for an athlete.”

While pursuing his demanding fitness regime, Greer has also earned the equivalent of a master’s degree in military science and a Ph.D. in psychology; organized eight businesses, including a material handling firm for the cotton industry; stayed in the active reserves for the Army, reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel; written two books; and raised six children. Greer has 13 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. He and his wife Marti are in the USA Triathlon Federation South Midwest Hall of Fame, and she is in the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame for gymnastics.

greer imageGreer advises endurance athletes and others as a certified life coach (greercoach.com), more motivational than technical. “I motivate people to do the sports if they’re interested in being motivated. I’ve motivated lots of athletes who came to me and said ‘what do I do to get started?’” he says. “I give them my formula. It’s not even written down. I tell them, ‘here’s the three stages you’re going to be involved with me. Then get a good coach.’” One woman who took his advice became one of the top ultra-endurance athletes in the world, winning double Ironmans five times in eight years.

In his spare time, Greer rides a Harley-Davidson and studies U.S. presidents. Recently, a remark about Jimmy Carter’s goal-setting inspired him to make a long-range list that will take him to 91. That includes at least 10 events, including three half-marathons, a year, and probably some more Ironman races.

“That’s the way I do my life,” he says. “It’s been a full life up to here, and you know what? It’s not over. During the years, I’ve tried to stay right on the cutting edge. I’ve been able to have a very diversified life.”

Introducing New All-Natural Lemonade The Right Stuff® Hydration from NASA

Introducing New All-Natural Lemonade The Right Stuff® Hydration from NASA

lemonade pouch 10-15New The Right Stuff® Lemonade is a new flavor of the same highly effective NASA-developed, blend of electrolytes, which as always, contains no carbohydrates. This new variety is sweetened with all-natural Stevia and like all the other flavors, is NSF Certified for Sport.

Based on numerous published studies (links can be found here on our website), The Right Stuff is far superior to any other NASA-tested formula for:

  • Combating the cramps, muscle fatigue, light-headedness and headaches caused by heavy sweating, dehydration and electrolyte loss
  • Increasing endurance by over 20% or more than any other NASA-tested formula
  • Improving core thermoregulation;protecting athletes’ bodies from overheating during times of intense exertion and in high heat settings

All versions of The Right Stuff are NSF-Certified for Sport and so are clear from all banned substances, heavy metals and contaminants.

High Schools and Colleges across the U.S., numerous pro teams (NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL and MLS) and Olympians along with first responders (firefighters, military) and industrial workers (construction and paving crews, roofers, parcel delivery etc.) all have integrated The Right Stuff into their training and event-day regimens.

Additionally, the NASA studies show thlemonadeat the formula is also a powerful aid for fighting the negative effects caused by Jet Lag and high altitude

To learn more:

Visit www.TheRightStuff-USA.com

Call 720-684-6584
Or
Click here to visit our Facebook Fan Page

Improving Nutrition Habits for High School, Collegiate and Professional Athletes

Improving Nutrition Habits for High School, Collegiate and Professional Athletes

Tavis PTavis Piattoly, who played football and other sports in high school, dropped 50 pounds in the summer after he graduated, before he enrolled in Louisiana State University as a pre-med student. Now he offers High School and other athletes the expert nutrition he wishes he would have known as a 17-year-old who got used to fast food before practice and Chinese buffet afterwards.

“I wish I’d had the knowledge then that I have now,” Piattoly says. “I wouldn’t have made such bad decisions. There was no one there to tell us.”

NO Saints croppedPiattoly switched his major to dietetics with an emphasis on sports nutrition and achieved his goal of working with the New Orleans Saints, for seven years. He’s worked 12 years with Tulane University and now operates his own My Sports Dietitian (www.mysportsd.com), an online education and software platform for athletes, parents, coaches, athletic trainers, and coaches that offers phone apps for tracking nutrition, one-on-one counseling for athletes, and a mentorship program for young sports nutrition students and practitioners.

Logo Tulane croppedSince he started at Tulane in 2003, Piattoly has seen rapid growth in staff Sports Dietitians in Division 1 schools, now totaling about 75. He believes the focus is spreading to the 8 million high school athletes and their parents who are seeking safer and more effective performance.

Focus on When and What You Eat

“You can change behavior more with a 14-year-old than a 28-year-old,” says Piattoly, who starts with a focus on when the athlete eats and then focuses on what they eat. “Now we know nutrition can give athletes a performance advantage if they time their intake correctly. High school athletes are underfueling their bodies to support their activity. Nutrition can make a good athlete great – or a great athlete good.”

Athletes who train five hours a day, maybe in two different sports, should eat about every three hours, he says. When Piattoly advises an athlete, he starts with a three-day food log to be sure they’re not energy-deprived – then starts replacing the breakfast doughnuts or toaster pastries with shakes, eggs, and oatmeal.

It all starts with timing. That’s the first nutritional strategy I employ.

“It all starts with timing,” he says. “That’s the first nutritional strategy I employ. If we can fix the ‘when,’ we can fix the ‘what.’ Ninety percent of the kids I work with are highly motivated. They realize nutrition is the piece they’ve been missing all along. Parents are a critical piece, especially Moms. Mom is usually the food provider for the athlete, or sometimes it’s a single dad.”

Piattoly helped a small-framed high school linebacker gain 50 pounds by his senior year and earn a college scholarship. He worked with a high school quarterback to add 20 pounds of lean muscle so he could attract college scouts.

“It’s all about teaching them to get enough calories to support what they’re trying to do,” he says. “It’s the missing component, it’s the secret weapon, it’s the component that leads to success in everything else.”

The food-first approach incorporates supplementation where appropriate, including The Right Stuff for heavy-sweating athletes and those susceptible to cramps. “In the New Orleans area, it’s really humid,” Piattoly says. “We use The Right Stuff with a lot of our athletes that are heavy sweaters. It’s good for any athlete. We get a lot of sodium in our diet, but when we sweat it out at accelerated rates, we need to replenish it. Our body needs it.”

Interest in nutrition is expanding to younger ages because it both helps prevent injury and enhances performance. “We’re going to see this field continue to expand throughout the collegiate level, high school, club teams,” Piattoly says. “It’s going to trickle down, just like athletic trainers did in the past”

World Champion San Francisco Giants Count on The Right Stuff to Keep Their Ballplayers Well Hydrated

World Champion San Francisco Giants Count on The Right Stuff to Keep Their Ballplayers Well Hydrated

The MLB (Major League Baseball) Defending World Champion San Francisco Giants, with a strong emphasis on nutrition and hydration, turn to The Right Stuff® when players need an electrolyte boost, says Carl Kochan, the team’s head Strength and Conditioning coach. carl-kochanThe World Champions, who adopted the NASA-developed product, as an important part of their hydration program more than two years ago, consumed as much of The Right Stuff in this year’s Spring Training as all last year’s regular season as players became more familiar with its benefits.

The Importance of Hydration

“Hydration is a huge component of performance as well as recovery,” Kochan says.

MLB Logo SF Giants BallIn addition to the challenges of practice and games, the Giants need regular hydration for their long flights to East Coast and Midwest opponents. They are among the most-traveled MLB team, and hours in dry airplane air require regular moisture replenishment.

“There’s evidence-based research out there that not just athletes but everyday people flying can need eight ounces of water for every hour in the air,” Kochan says. “With our rigorous travel schedule, some guys are not doing the best of their ability to eat properly as pertains to performance.”

Players can turn to The Right Stuff before, during, and after the practice or game for that extra boost.

Sweaty destinations, especially during the summer months, also can remove more water and nutrients than players restore with ordinary eating and drinking. Players can turn to The Right Stuff before, during, and after practice or games for that extra boost. The product is available to the whole team, and individuals choose when to use it.

“It changes each day because guys’ hydration levels change each day,” Kochan says “The ultimate goal is to educate each player. You do your best as part of a medical staff to educate players so they can make a good performance nutrition decisions. They need to get their electrolytes balanced for the best performance on the field. If they’ve thought about that, we’ve done our job.”

As part of a comprehensive nutrition and hydration program, The Right Stuff helps players feel well-prepared for play rather than sluggish and lethargic, Kochan says.

[Editors Note: The Right Stuff is not another sports drink, it is serious hydration for serious athletes™.  The company participates in the NSF Certified for Sport program, so every batch is independently tested and cleared not to contain any banned substances, heavy metals or other adulterants.]

Pro Hockey (AHL) Athletic Trainer Saves “Heavy-Sweater” Goalie from Dehydration Symptoms

kevin-kacerKevin Kacer chose to attend Indiana Central University, now the University of Indianapolis, because he figured he’d get more experience as a student athletic trainer at the small school. He was right.

“I was the only student trainer there my freshman year,” says Kacer, who had seen programs with dozens of students at Purdue University and Indiana University. “It was a small Division 2 school. I knew I would get a lot of experience early in my collegiate career. I was traveling with the football team, I had the baseball team, I did wrestling and basketball.

I wanted to be an athletic trainer

“I knew when I was in high school that I wanted to be an athletic trainer,” he says, adding that his high school coach and athletic director sent him to summer camps for trainers. “I played sports growing up. I came to that realization that I wasn’t going to go much further playing sports, but I liked it and I liked helping people.”

Kacer earned his degree in physical education and, with his extensive experience, passed a national exam to become an athletic traChicago Wolves Logo croppediner. The head athletic trainer at the university, who had moved to Fort Wayne and opened a sports medicine clinic, helped Kacer get a job with the Fort Wayne Flames pro indoor soccer team. After two years, he moved to the Fort Wayne Komets of the International Hockey League, then the Fort Wayne Fury of the Continental Basketball Association. After two years as an assistant trainer with the Detroit Pistons, Kacer moved in 1995 to the Chicago Wolves of the American Hockey League, where he is head athletic trainer.

“I have everything to do with the health and safety of the players,” he says. “I manage all of their injuries. I’m the guy that takes care of their first aid needs, emergency needs. I’m that first responder when something happens to one of our players. Their health and safety is my No. 1 concern. I’m doing what I wanted to do.” Kacer is a member of the Professional Hockey Athletic Trainers Society (PHATS) , National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA), and American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

I’ve grown to use The Right Stuff for a lot more of my guys that are chronic sweaters.

A few years ago, he suggested The Right Stuff to a goalie who is a heavy sweater. “And, now he uses it religiously,” Kacer says. “He loses a lot of water weight both in practice and in games. It became a problem with him, getting dehydrated and losing that edge.  (Editor’s Note: Studies show hockey players are some of the heaviest sweaters among team sports athletes; e.g., 3+ L/game) .  I’ve grown to use The Right Stuff for a lot more of my guys that are chronic sweaters. They get overheated and lose that edge. It’s a very, very physical, demanding sport. Our games are usually two plus hours. It’s a pretty good aerobic sport.  The Right Stuff has been helping our team for a few years now!”

The Right Stuff Introduces our Newest Athlete Advocate – Chance Warmack of the Tennessee Titans

the-right-stuff-football-advocates-chance-warmack-2

NFL Tennessee Titans’ first-round draft pick and University of Alabama All-American, Chance Warmack has been relying on The Right Stuff® (from Wellness Brands Inc.) since his junior year when the electrolyte drink additive energized him during a game in the Florida Gators’ Swamp.

“It was so humid, and I was really concerned as to how I would sustain,” he recalls. “The Right Stuff really helps me make it through all four quarters. I noticed it helps me to relax more and gives me an extra boost during long plays and drives.”

Warmack, who signed a four-year, $12.2 million contract with the Titans in July, still depends on The Right Stuff for his pro career as an NFL Offensive Guard. He becomes the latest Athlete Advocate for the NASA-developed formula joining Walter Dix (Olympic Medal-winning Sprinter), Michael McDowell (NASCAR), Brent Morel (MLB), Megan Whiteside (Former World Snowboard Champion), Craig Evans (Pro Triathlete) among others.

“While preparing for the NFL draft combine, I continued to use The Right Stuff, and it worked wonders in assisting my preparation,” he says. “I would sweat a lot during practices and workouts, and more so while playing in games. I began using The Right Stuff and not only did it hydrate me but it also decreased the chances of my getting cramps.

“Now that I’m a professional for the Tennessee Titans, The Right Stuff is not only my exclusive product for hydration, but it is the absolute best out there.”

The Right Stuff formula, developed by NASA scientistDr. John Greenleaf and licensed to Wellness Brands Inc. of Boulder, Colo., was created to combat the severe symptoms of dehydration astronauts experience upon re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere.

The sugar-free, liquid concentrate – when added to water – delivers significantly more electrolytes, replacing the amount lost through sweat from heat or rigorous exercise lasting over an hour.

“The Right Stuff is serious hydration for serious athletes,” says Wellness Brands CEO David Belaga, adding that the no-nonsense performance aid is not a substitute for other sports drinks used by ordinary exercisers.

It’s now available and being used here on Earth by professional, college, high school and Olympic athletes as well as industrial workers, military personnel and firefighters who perform hot, strenuous tasks. “The Right Stuff is the best product out there for energy boost and hydration,” Warmack says. “I highly recommend everyone give it a shot when participating in competitive sports – college, pro and Olympic – for training and game day.”

Based on numerous published studies, the formula is far superior for 1) combating dehydration symptoms (cramps, headaches, muscle fatigue, light-headedness etc.) and 2) improving core thermal regulation which means it helps protect the body from overheating, as well as 3) increasing endurance by over 20 percent more than any other NASA-tested formula.

“Also, it is a great aid for jet lag, altitude sickness and even for relief from the effects of excessive alcohol consumption,” Belaga says.

Boulder, Colorado based Wellness Brands Inc., introduced The Right Stuff® in 2009 upon receipt of the exclusive NASA license. The NASA-developed hydration technology is marketed throughout the US and internationally.the-right-stuff-football-advocates-chance-warmack-1

Drew Cole – Motocross – The Right Stuff Athlete Advocate

I have had the opportunity to evaluate the free samples, received through Hookit…and was very happy with the results. My evaluation consisted of 4 days of 4-6 hours of single track and motocross riding in 94-96 degree heat (Durhamtown, GA), in full motocross racing gear. Needless to say, heavy sweating, dehydration and overheating is the norm. On day one, I drank pure coconut water in my hydration pack and suffered from dehydration towards the end of my ride (primarily fatigue & overheating with minor chills). Over the next 2 days, I mixed two pouches of the citrus blend with 3-4, 16 oz bottles of water in my hydration pack. After the exact same rides in nearly identical conditions, I experienced a significant decrease in symptoms. My endurance was sustainable and core temps seemed manageable.

Drew Cole - MotoCross Athlete Advocate
Drew Cole – MotoCross Athlete Advocate

Meredith Dolhare – The Right Stuff USA – Athlete and Advocate

Meredith Dolhare - The Right Stuff - USA Advocate

Meredith Dolhare - The Right Stuff - USA Athlete

“Rarely if ever do I trust a product enough to try it for the first time in race conditions, but I had heard such great things about The Right Stuff by NASA that I decided to wing it for a very hot and humid 50-miler in my lead up to the BADWATER 135-mile Ultramarathon. Honestly, I felt like I could run through a brick wall the entire time, and ended up winning the race overall (in the women’s field) by a couple of hours! Then, I ingested a packet immediately post race and was ready to train again by Monday, and race another double marathon by the weekend even faster than the 50-miler on a harder course. The Right Stuff is amazing before, during and after training or racing for endurance and recovery. Take my word for it!”

Ultra-endurance athlete (Timex Multisport Team)
Philanthropist

Completed 12 full Ironmans & 12 half Ironmans

Qualified for:
Kona
Powerman World Championships
USAT Long Course Worlds

Raced:
Brazil 135-mile 
Rouge-Orleans 126.2

Completed:
3 Ironmans in 3 Weeks:
France Ironman
Austria Ironman
Switzerland Ironman

Ultraman UK five weeks later 

2013 – qualified for:
Badwater 135-mile Ultramarathon (finished third) 
Furnace Creek 508-mile Bicycle Race (upcoming)

Meredith raises funds for Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF) and own non-profit RunningWorks (for the homeless and disadvantaged communities)
Running Works

Scott Tietzel – Pro Cyclist – On The Right Stuff

Pro Cyclist (Team Specialized), 2011 Leadville 100; 11-place finish overall and #1 finish in age group 20-29

Scott Tietzel, pro cyclist, has raced in the “Bailey Hundo” competition. A 100 mi race designed for endurance cyclist with 12,740 ft of climbing terrain.
On June 16 2012, Scott set a course record of 6 hrs 28:55 minutes.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qh_HjP1PcNA]

One of the main issues I had with endurance cycling was cramping and so the high sodium content / electrolyte balance really was a great advantage for me.

I use it before to prehydrate before a big event. I’ll do that the day before, the morning before an event, then I will also use it during an event. If I have a long race, I will get bottles at the feed zone so that I am hydrating during an event and then after a big effort, six or seven hours on the bike. Even if you are drinking as much as you can you are going to be dehydrated, so I use The Right Stuff afterwards as well.

Last year in Leadville, five hours into the race I was really starting to hit the wall and I had a bottle with The Right Stuff in there and I was able to finish up strong and I was actually able to pass up some guys that were in the same spot that I was earlier and without a doubt it was because of The Right Stuff.

5 Tips To Maximize Your Training

With the arrival of spring, you can see them all over. In brightly-colored clothes in suburban areas, weaving in and out of pedestrians under the watchful gaze of skyscrapers or on solitary bike trails early in the morning. Spring heralds the time of year when endurance athletes comes out of the winter months to begin training for the long-awaited races.

The Country Music Marathon, The Badwater Ultramarathon, The Race Across America and your local 10K or half-marathon race for charity in your neck of the woods all mean one thing to the endurance athlete – training.
Whether for the fun of it or the competition, maximizing your experience in event training is of utmost importance. Proper training will benefit the endurance athlete to help avoid physical injury either before, during or after the competition.

Here are a some well-recognized tips to consider when training:

1. Do not overtrain – although this may seem like a good idea, overtraining can actually damage your body faster. Oftentimes, endurance athletes feel as though their training regimen is not effective enough and so they train harder. This can be the root of overtraining. Although training or exercise is the root to strong competition. It is the proper rest after the exercise that makes an endurance athlete fit. A great aid for balanced training is to keep a log. Your log should show elevated training periods over a long period of time as your body begins to strengthen and adjust to your regimen.

2.  Pay attention to Injuries, especially seemingly minor injuries – nearly every athlete will injure themselves to some degree, either during training or during the competition. The relative impact of how that injury effects you during competition is determined by your responding quickly. This requires that you understand how your body responds to certain stimuli. Know your gait, your stride, your breathing patterns. Understanding your body on this level will allow you to catch injuries as early as possible and can help protect you from exacerbating the injury.

3. Cross Train – Although many athletes believe that total focus on their single sport (e.g., running) may be the best course of action, The American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine encourages cross training as the ‘total body tune-up, something that can not be achieved if an athlete concentrates on just one type of activity.’ And it is notable that it goes on to say that cross training may help the athlete “experience fewer overuse injuries”.

4.  Train Carefully and Thoughtfully – An athletes training for an endurance race, be it cycling, a marathon or a triathlon – needs to begin months in advance. This will begin to prepare your body for the task it will undertake. This training is not only a physical effort but, as importantly, a mental one. Endurance competition begins before the proverbial rubber ever meets the road. It begins in the mind. Set goals for yourself and fully develop the mental aspect of how you will, and did, accomplish that goal.   As you train, listen to your body to determine what works best for you. Keep a log of how long you trained, which types of exercise you did, what you ate and don’t forget to also log your fluid intake.

5.  Nutrition and Hydration – If you speak with the most every elite athlete, they will quickly let you know that it is not only critical to train your body through exercise but it is equally important to take care of yourself on the inside too.  The foods you eat (macro-nutrients; carbs, protein and fat) are essential to a successful training program.  Be sure to eat a healthy and varied diet (cross-train your digestion system too)!  And, especially as we head into the warmer months, be sure to hydrate.  But remember, water alone may not be enough.  When you train in excess of an hour your body can excrete grams of electrolytes (e.g. sodium and chloride) through your sweat.  You need to replenish those too.  Doing so will provide you the best recipe for success for your body.