A Different Perspective for Athletes to Consider: Don’t Ice for Recovery

A Different Perspective for Athletes to Consider: Don’t Ice for Recovery

gary-reinlDistance runner Gary Reinl’s meticulous reporting destroyed the long-held practice of rest and ice for healing injuries, restoring the natural course of healing by the inflammatory response assisted by muscle activation – the intuitive “walk it off” order of coaches in his childhood. His insistence on scientific evidence also makes him a user and advocate of The Right Stuff hydration formula developed by NASA.

Reinl, 63, who started running in the 1960s on water and sometimes salt tablets, remembers a nearly 70-mile run from Philadelphia to Ocean City, N.J., in the summer of 1971 wearing Converse sneakers and sipping water from front-yard hoses on the route.

“Everything we did was wrong,” he says. “I’ve done it wrong, and I’ve done it right, and I’m certain that doing it right is way better.”

icedWhen it comes to treating injuries, doing it right is the opposite of conventional wisdom that held sway for decades under the popular acronym RICE – Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Reinl’s relentless research found support for the approach, and Dr. Gabe Mirkin, who coined the term in 1978, recanted in the foreword to Reinl’s 2014 book Iced! The Illusionary Treatment Option.

Shifting the Conversation

“We have begun to shift the conversation. We’re shifting it to muscle activation to solve the problem,” says Reinl, who represents an electro-muscle stimulation device, MARC PRO® (Muscle Activated Recovery Cascade), that promotes muscle activation. “Why would you put ice on damaged tissue? People believe it reduces swelling. It doesn’t reduce swelling. It actually increases swelling. Your immune system knows how to handle it. That’s why it sends fluid to the damaged area. Why would you try to reduce the amount of fluid sent to the damaged site?”

Ice slows the natural repair process by shutting off signals between muscles and nerves. Inflammation is a necessary part of the healing process as the body rushes blood and nutrients to the area, and muscle activation helps flush out the extra fluids through the lymphatic system. “The last thing you’d want to do is restrict swelling coming to the area,” Reinl says. “You do want the fluid to come. What you don’t want it to do is accumulate and settle.”

In fact, the delay caused by icing can suffocate healthy cells that would not have died as a result of the injury, a secondary cellular death that Reinl calls “negligent homicide.”

Reinl traced the origins of the “Ice Age” to 1962, when a physician successfully reattached the arm, preserved on ice, of a 12-year-old who was injured while jumping a train in Massachusetts. The story became a sensation, and people mistakenly associated ice with healing. “The intent of putting the severed body arm on ice was to preserve the severed body part,” he explains. “It had nothing to do with damaged tissue; it had to do with managing a severed body part.”

The RICE Approach

riceAfter Mirkin published his RICE approach in 1978, soccer moms everywhere kept nifty snap-and-chill ice packs in their pocketbooks. Athletic trainers, who became common on sports teams in the 1980s, could not perform medical procedures but could legally apply ice. Even after Medicare, recognizing the lack of evidence, stopped reimbursing for ice treatments in physical therapy clinics, the practice thrived in sports.

Reinl has worked with athletic trainers and physical therapists from more than 80 professional teams and other elite athletes who have stopped or reduced their use of ice, although some star athletes still insist on the old approach.

These days, Reinl, whose lifetime running total is above 50,000 miles, lives in the Las Vegas desert and routinely runs 10 miles through a canyon where temperatures can exceed 113 degrees. He preps with a pre-run dose of The Right Stuff and takes another packet for each hour on the road when he returns, ensuring that his body chemistry remains optimal for tissue regeneration and recovery.

“You know how good you feel from it,” he says, adding that his son, a lawyer, rejects all otherright-stuff supplements but adopts The Right Stuff regimen. “I can go out and run 20 in the desert and I’m perfectly fine. I carry a couple of gallons of water with me. I stay fully hydrated on my runs.”

He recommends The Right Stuff to runners, endurance athletes, military personnel, and even golfers who spend long hours in the hot sun. You can check out the science behind The Right Stuff.        [Editors Note: links to NASA studies can be found on the brand’s website at http://tiny.cc/TheRightStuffStudies]

“Any elites I talk to, I say just look around and look at how people are trying to solve the problem,” Reinl says. “Look at the science behind The Right Stuff.  It improves muscle function. It improves your physiology. It improves muscle activation. It feels good. Every edge counts.”

 

Ultra-Runner Shares How She Wins at Everything!

Ultra-Runner Shares How She Wins at Everything!

meredith-dolhare-badwaterAfter a stellar career in high school and college tennis, a busy married life with two young children, a newspaper column on fitness and a career in PR and advertising, a business as a certified personal trainer, and extensive volunteer work, Meredith Dolhare found herself sidelined with a second badly broken foot in 2007. Her husband Walter suggested she set a goal, and she picked Iron Man – although she didn’t own a bicycle. Dolhare started spinning classes while she was still wearing a cast and competed in her first Iron Man in 2008.

Finding Her Outlet

“I realized I had the bandwidth for it,” she says. “I ran a marathon right before it in Prague. I realized that I liked the long stuff and I had a real knack for the bike. I found my outlet for competitiveness.” She ran 12 Iron Mans in three years, Ironman colored logoincluding three on consecutive weekends in the Alps followed a month later by an Ultraman in the United Kingdom – 6.2 miles swimming, 261.4 miles biking, and 52.4 miles running.

After spinal surgery in 2012, Dolhare returned to run a 100-kilometer race and a 135-mile race. She struggled with nausea – vomiting frequently during races when she ate solid food or too many calories.

The Right Stuff has made a huge, huge difference. The first race I used, it I won

“I have a lot of trouble with electrolyte imbalance,” she says. “The Right Stuff has made a huge, huge difference. The first race I used it, I won” – two hours ahead of the second-place woman in a 50-mile race that was training for the 135-Badwater 135mile Badwater in Death Valley, with temperatures up to 130 degrees. The next weekend, she finished a double marathon in San Francisco even faster, and she placed third among women in Badwater, where she took a bottle of The Right Stuff every 2½ hours. Months later, she finished the companion 508-mile Death Valley Cup – the sixth woman ever to complete both races in the same calendar year.

“I used The Right Stuff also during the bike race,” she says. “I couldn’t have done it without it. That product really works for me. I use it sometimes before I run, during the run, after the run. I drink it during the day.” Her 14-year-old son and some others on his cross-country team that she coaches also use The Right Stuff.

Athletic Participation is a Longtime Focus

Athletic participation is a longtime focus for Dolhare, who grew up in Memphis and was the 9th-ranked U.S. tennis player when she graduated from high school. She went to UCLA on a scholarship but transferred after her freshman year to Vanderbilt University, where she was captain of a team that rose from 72nd in the country to eighth by the time she graduated with honors. “It was a great experience,” she says. “I loved it.” But her extensive play – singles and doubles, fall and spring – left her overused shoulder too damaged to pursue a professional tennis career.

Non-Profit Engages People Through Running

After the NCAA tournament her senior year, she married Walter, a star tennis player at the University of Notre Dame who had gone into banking. She started work in advertising and public relations, as well as her “Get off the couch” newspaper column. The couple moved from Memphis to Charlotte soon after their first son was born, and she started volunteering and fundraising. In 2012, she founded RunningWorks, a non-profit running program that engages people in running to foster teamwork, discipline, confidence, self-respect, and respect for others.

Pro Tennis Player Saves Himself from Dehydration and Credits NASA

Pro Tennis Player Saves Himself from Dehydration and Credits NASA

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tim-kpulunTim Kpulun was wilting in the Florida heat and humidity, about to run out of energy in the four-hour match, out of all his usual supplements to keep his body in balance, when he remembered the packs of The Right Stuff that a friend had given him. He took the NASA-developed hydration drink additive, called The Right Stuff® for the first time. He felt the power return, and went on to win the match.

I tried The Right Stuff and I felt and saw a difference

“I tried The Right Stuff and I felt and saw a difference,” he recalls. “It is this thing that rejuvenated me. I came through a really difficult match. My body was calm. It wasn’t my fitness that got me through. It is this thing that rejuvenated me. I felt like I came alive.”

Tennis is Life

concordiaFor Tim Kpulun, who grew up in London, started playing tennis at age 7, attended Concordia University in Irvine, Calif., and went pro after his college success, tennis is life. At his parents’ urging in his youth, he switched from playing both soccer and tennis to concentrating on the individual sport. At Concordia, he lost only three matches in three years and realized he could pursue a career.

“There was a year where I went the whole season and I lost one match,” he recalls. “To do this is not easy. I thought, ‘I must be doing something correct. After I’m done, I’m going to give it a shot, put everything into tennis. I am a better tennis player than I was, that’s for sure. It’s made me a better competitor, a better athlete. It turned out to be life-changing I have grown as a person. This sport has designed me. The life that you have is all around this. It’s in your blood. It’s what you do.”

Living in Southern California, Kpulun relates to numerous leading coaches for advice about his game. He has ranked as high as 622; his ranking has dipped to around 800, but he is redoubling his focus and expects to advance quickly. At that level, matches are often in difficult venues and climates where matches don’t stop when the temperature reaches 105 degrees or more. Later this year, for example, Kpulun plans to travel to Cambodia.

“Some of the tournaments we play, they’re not in pleasant places,” he says, adding that The Right Stuff helps him succeed in such environments. “You have no choice. You’ve got to deal with the conditions. Everything there is to test your physicality. You need something to keep you. You need the best thing for you.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

“I need this thing to survive those climates. I love Florida, but it’s humid – you’re sweating eating lunch, you’re dehydrated maybe in your sleep. I’m in ridiculously good shape, but it doesn’t matter what shape you’re in – if you don’t have the right thing in your body, you will break. For the conditions we play in, The Right Stuff®has been the best thing by a mile.” [Editor’s Note: Learn more at www.TheRightStuff-USA.com ]

Introducing New All-Natural Lemonade The Right Stuff® Hydration from NASA

Introducing New All-Natural Lemonade The Right Stuff® Hydration from NASA

lemonade pouch 10-15New The Right Stuff® Lemonade is a new flavor of the same highly effective NASA-developed, blend of electrolytes, which as always, contains no carbohydrates. This new variety is sweetened with all-natural Stevia and like all the other flavors, is NSF Certified for Sport.

Based on numerous published studies (links can be found here on our website), The Right Stuff is far superior to any other NASA-tested formula for:

  • Combating the cramps, muscle fatigue, light-headedness and headaches caused by heavy sweating, dehydration and electrolyte loss
  • Increasing endurance by over 20% or more than any other NASA-tested formula
  • Improving core thermoregulation;protecting athletes’ bodies from overheating during times of intense exertion and in high heat settings

All versions of The Right Stuff are NSF-Certified for Sport and so are clear from all banned substances, heavy metals and contaminants.

High Schools and Colleges across the U.S., numerous pro teams (NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL and MLS) and Olympians along with first responders (firefighters, military) and industrial workers (construction and paving crews, roofers, parcel delivery etc.) all have integrated The Right Stuff into their training and event-day regimens.

Additionally, the NASA studies show thlemonadeat the formula is also a powerful aid for fighting the negative effects caused by Jet Lag and high altitude

To learn more:

Visit www.TheRightStuff-USA.com

Call 720-684-6584
Or
Click here to visit our Facebook Fan Page

The Secret to Ironman Success!

The Secret to Ironman Success!

The day after another disappointing, cramp-hampered Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii, George Robb was walking down Mauna Lani Drive when he noticed an empty packet labeled The Right Stuff that someone had tossed on the ground. Intrigued, he conducted some online research and discovered that the NASA-developed formula contained sodium citrate which might solve his decade-long frustration where high-quantity consumption of salt pills had failed.pouch on road 5in

“My Achilles Heel has always been cramping in the marathon of the Iron Man,” says Robb, 54, who has qualified for the Ironman championship since 2006. “I always got a cramp in my quad and I thought it was fatigue from cycling. I would get myself into incredible cycle shape and it would still happen 10 miles in to the marathon – I can remember the spot in Hawaii where it always happened. I’m pretty competitive. I would have been top three in my age group if I had not been ground to a halt by debilitating pain.”

The Right Stuff solved his cramping problem, which also shored up in his swimming, and energized his cycling. “I was talking about having to quit swim practice or slow down because of these cramps,” he says. “All of a sudden that’s gone. We’d go on these long bike rides and I’d take bottles of water with one packed of The Right Stuff in each water bottle on these long rides and I wouldn’t need as much nutrition or carbohydrates. What I thought was the depletion of calories was actually the onset of dehydration. I don’t have to eat like a horse on these long rides.”

What I thought was the depletion of calories was actually the onset of dehydration.

Robb and his wife, Linda Neary, a multiple champion triathlete herself, both recommend The Right Stuff at their Tri Bike Run store on US1 in Juno Beach, Fla., and customers come back for more. George is competing in two Ironmans this year, hoping to qualify for Kona again now that he’s solved his cramping problem with The Right Stuff. “There’s nothing like it,” he says. “I’m a heavy sweater, and I lose a lot of water when I work out. Anyone who is a super sweater should definitely use this. That stuff really works.”

This Sports Dietitian handles all those college athletes and still finds time to compete in Triathlons and Marathons

John TanguayMassachusetts native Jonathan Tanguay was in Colorado, waiting tables, hiking, and trying to figure out what to do with his undergraduate degree in zoology from Connecticut College, when he took a biochemistry course that bonded his various interests. He graduated from the master’s program in nutritional science at the University of New Hampshire, moved to Texas for a dietetic internship at the University of Houston, and found his dream during a month-long rotation at Texas A&M.

“I loved it,” Tanguay says. “That was what I wanted to do. That was the application of all the sports nutrition I had and the love of sport I had and getting involved in something with structure. Every day is unique.”

Tanguay, who was named Texas A&M’s Director of Performance Nutrition in 2010, has a full-time assistant who focuses on Olympic sports while he hands mostly football, baseball and basketball.

“My office is our football weight room,” he says. Four days a week, he works with football players in training, taking their weight, talking to them about fueling and nutrition, and making sure they get recovery smoothies after their workouts. In the afternoons, he works with baseball and basketball players before practice across campus, then returns for football practice and dinner in the new R.C. Slocum Nutrition Center, a dining hall for athletes.

Focus on Sports Nutrition in College

The NCAA’s recent announcement that it is lifting limits on food that schools can provide to athletes, effective Aug. 1, will accelerate a focus on sports nutrition that has swept through leading colleges in recent years, including most members of the Southeastern Conference, the Atlantic Coast Conference, the Big 12, Big 10 and others, Tanguay says.

“In the long run, it’s going to be something that’s really great for the student-athlete,” he says. “They’re bigger, they’re stronger, they’re burning a lot more calories, they’re working out and practicing – that requires more fuel. We were only allowed to feed the team as a team one meal a day outside of competition.”

The old rules left students using a scholarship stipend to buy campus meal plans, off-campus meals, or food to prepare in their apartments – with less-than-optimal attention to nutrition.

“This will allow us to provide them the food that will meet their unique nutritional needs, to help them develop as healthy athletes, and be good for their overall health,” Tanguay says, adding that the students come from a wide spectrum of food experience in their backgrounds.

“It’s definitely challenging,” he says. “You get kids from all walks of life. We’ve got Sports Dietitians here that can really help to be hands-on with the student-athletes and work to educate them about making better choices.” The education includes cooking demonstrations at the Nutrition Education Center and trips to the grocery to learn how to select, store, prepare, and cook food. “Some don’t get it at first, but for someone who’s trying to gain weight or lose weight or reduce their risk for injury, they start coming to me and taking advantage of these resources,” Tanguay says.

Not every approach works with every athlete, but The Right Stuff is a great tool we have from a hydration standpoint.

The Right Stuff is one of the resources. “We use it as part of our hydration protocol” he says. “It’s another tool we have in our belts. There’s a number of sports nutrition products on the market and a number of different approaches. Not every approach works with every athlete, but The Right Stuff is a great tool we have from a hydration standpoint. We use it with a number of different sports.”

Tanguay participates in Iron Mans, half-Iron Mans, and marathons – he set a personal record (PR) at this year’s Boston Marathon – and includes The Right Stuff in his personal regimen. “I start to build my carbohydrate and electrolyte intake a week before the race,” he says. “I’ve got a pre-race routine. For me, it’s been trial and error. I’ve come up with something that works for me. The Right Stuff is part of that.

“I’ve never really had an issue with cramping or GI issues during a race. I like The Right Stuff because it gives you everything you need in one package. Before it came out, we had been looking for something that fit the criteria, and it wasn’t on the market. It’s the volume of electrolytes in a small volume of fluid. This is a small, convenient way to get everything you need that we’ve found works.”

What Can This NASCAR Driver Teach You About Optimal Hydration?

Michael Mcdowell - The Right StuffAfter racecar driver Michael McDowell switched to NASCAR from sports cars and Indy cars in 2007, he suffered extreme dehydration on a track in Virginia and went looking for a solution.

“I was doing a lot of research and trying to find out how to stay hydrated,” says McDowell, a Phoenix-area native who moved to Charlotte in 2004. “At the time, I was losing anywhere from 8 to 10 pounds per race of water during the race itself. I was trying to figure out a way to stay hydrated. You’re in the car four or five hours. It’s 110 to 130 degrees inside the car. Obviously, in our sport, hydration is key.”

When driving around the track at over 150 mph, reaction time is critical. Proper hydration is essential to maintain that continuous, nearly instantaneous response timing.

He first learned about The Right Stuff® when he was at an event with former NASA Space Shuttle Pilot Bill Gregory who uses it for his endurance training. Bill is an enthusiastic user of The Right Stuff who even joined the Board of Wellness Brands, makers of The Right Stuff. Since McDowell found The Right Stuff three years ago, he has cut his water consumption during races by half, from 64 to 32 ounces.

The Advantage

“I feel like it gives me an advantage,” he says. “During the race weekends, I will take it within an hour leading up to the race. Then, in the middle of the race I’ll take one as well. I just mix it in the water and have it in the car with me. It works well. One of the main reasons I continue to use it is because I simply don’t lose as much water throughout the event, so I don’t have to rehydrate as much. I’m not losing as much, which is ideal for me.”

One of the main reasons I continue to use it is because I simply don’t lose as much water throughout the event, so I don’t have to rehydrate as much

McDowell also turns to The Right Stuff when he’s involved in other sweaty sports, such as when he competes in triathlons.

“For me, I take it when I know I’m going to do something that’s going to be extreme and long-lasting,” he says. “I use it for all of those extreme conditions.”

The Right Stuff – USA

So this is David Belaga talking to you from Kansas City at the CSCCA Convention about The Right Stuff which is a NASA hydration formula. It was developed because the astronauts suffered severe dehydration when they come back into the gravity of earth and as NASA likes to do they spent over a decade conducting dozens of clinical studies to refine and optimize the formula and the resulting formula, The Right Stuff, significantly outperformed every other product tested in three critical ways:
1. It does a much better job fighting the symptoms of dehydration via cramps, headaches, muscle fatigue, ect.
2. It was also shown to improve core thermo-regulation. So it protects the body from overheating both in times of high exertion and in high heat settings.
3. And then it was also shown to imcrease athletic endurance by over 20% more than any other product tested by NASA so you aren’t talking small increments, you’re talking significant improvments.
For more information, go to www.therightstuff-usa.com.

Welcome to The Right Stuff® from Nasa

From Athlete to Astronaut – The causes of dehydration may be different but the symptoms of dehydration are the same: Cramps, Headaches, Light Headedness, Muscle Fatigue, Disorientation, etc. For athletes, it’s the exertion, the sun exposure or the altitude. For astronauts, its microgravity and re-entry.

It took NASA to launch the formula for The Right Stuff®. But, it took them over a decade of testing with athletes and astronauts to get it just right. The Right Stuff® is superior for:

  • Fighting the symptoms of dehydration,
  • Increasing athletic endurance, and
  • Improving core thermoregulation; protecting the body from overheating in high exertion/high heat environments

From triathletes to motocross to baseball to football players, all have enjoyed the superior results of The Right Stuff as their hydration drink supplement of choice.

We look forward to bringing you updated information about our product and our athlete advocates in the future.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at
www.therightstuff-usa.com