Ultra-Runner Shares How She Wins at Everything!

Ultra-Runner Shares How She Wins at Everything!

meredith-dolhare-badwaterAfter a stellar career in high school and college tennis, a busy married life with two young children, a newspaper column on fitness and a career in PR and advertising, a business as a certified personal trainer, and extensive volunteer work, Meredith Dolhare found herself sidelined with a second badly broken foot in 2007. Her husband Walter suggested she set a goal, and she picked Iron Man – although she didn’t own a bicycle. Dolhare started spinning classes while she was still wearing a cast and competed in her first Iron Man in 2008.

Finding Her Outlet

“I realized I had the bandwidth for it,” she says. “I ran a marathon right before it in Prague. I realized that I liked the long stuff and I had a real knack for the bike. I found my outlet for competitiveness.” She ran 12 Iron Mans in three years, Ironman colored logoincluding three on consecutive weekends in the Alps followed a month later by an Ultraman in the United Kingdom – 6.2 miles swimming, 261.4 miles biking, and 52.4 miles running.

After spinal surgery in 2012, Dolhare returned to run a 100-kilometer race and a 135-mile race. She struggled with nausea – vomiting frequently during races when she ate solid food or too many calories.

The Right Stuff has made a huge, huge difference. The first race I used, it I won

“I have a lot of trouble with electrolyte imbalance,” she says. “The Right Stuff has made a huge, huge difference. The first race I used it, I won” – two hours ahead of the second-place woman in a 50-mile race that was training for the 135-Badwater 135mile Badwater in Death Valley, with temperatures up to 130 degrees. The next weekend, she finished a double marathon in San Francisco even faster, and she placed third among women in Badwater, where she took a bottle of The Right Stuff every 2½ hours. Months later, she finished the companion 508-mile Death Valley Cup – the sixth woman ever to complete both races in the same calendar year.

“I used The Right Stuff also during the bike race,” she says. “I couldn’t have done it without it. That product really works for me. I use it sometimes before I run, during the run, after the run. I drink it during the day.” Her 14-year-old son and some others on his cross-country team that she coaches also use The Right Stuff.

Athletic Participation is a Longtime Focus

Athletic participation is a longtime focus for Dolhare, who grew up in Memphis and was the 9th-ranked U.S. tennis player when she graduated from high school. She went to UCLA on a scholarship but transferred after her freshman year to Vanderbilt University, where she was captain of a team that rose from 72nd in the country to eighth by the time she graduated with honors. “It was a great experience,” she says. “I loved it.” But her extensive play – singles and doubles, fall and spring – left her overused shoulder too damaged to pursue a professional tennis career.

Non-Profit Engages People Through Running

After the NCAA tournament her senior year, she married Walter, a star tennis player at the University of Notre Dame who had gone into banking. She started work in advertising and public relations, as well as her “Get off the couch” newspaper column. The couple moved from Memphis to Charlotte soon after their first son was born, and she started volunteering and fundraising. In 2012, she founded RunningWorks, a non-profit running program that engages people in running to foster teamwork, discipline, confidence, self-respect, and respect for others.

National Champion High Jumper Set the Bar High!

National Champion High Jumper Set the Bar High!

Dusty Jonas USA over barNearly two decades ago, when Dusty Jonas was in grade school in Texas, he tried a variety of sports through CYO (Catholic Youth Organization) before he focused on the high jump in track.

“I started pretty young playing a lot of different sports,” he says. I had my first track meet, which down there we did it through CYO. I did soccer, basketball, track. At that age, 9 or 10, I wasn’t particularly good at any of them but I wasn’t bad either. I dropped soccer – too much running for me. I’ve been high jumping since then. I didn’t really get to an elite level until high school,” where he improved nearly a foot – from 6 feet 2 inches to 7 feet 1 inch – between his sophomore and junior years.Nebraska Cornhuskers

Jonas won a national championship with the University of Nebraska and made the U.S. Olympic Team as a high jumper in 2008 (Beijing) but sat out 2102 with an Achilles tendon injury. Now he is aiming for a spot on the U.S. 2016 Olympics.

Aiming for the U.S. 2016 Olympics

“They say the prime age for a high jumper is 28 to 30,” Jonas says. “I’m right in that right now. I feel good. I’m starting to really feel confident in what I’m able to do. Strength levels are good.”

Jonas has volunteered as a track coach at the University of Nebraska for the past five years, drawing on his own experience to help others as he adopts a final-year training regimen for his own Olympic hopes.

Dusty Jonas going over the bar“I started as a long and triple jump coach,” he says, “I did high jump, long jump, and triple jump in college. I really enjoy the vertical jumps as well. As a developing coach that really wants to learn, you want to have a broad knowledge of all the events. This year I’m working with my high jumpers and working with the men’s short sprints and hurdles. We’ve got a really good squad.”

A nutritionist at the University of Nebraska introduced Jonas to The Right Stuff early in 2014.

I get less muscle soreness and I feel a lot better hydrated during my workouts

“I got my hands on it from being around here,” he says. “I notice that during my training, especially days when I am running, days when it is hot, I get less muscle soreness I feel a lot better hydrated during my workouts.”

Jonas has already jumped 7 feet 8.5 inches this year, close to a personal best and a sign of successful rehab after his injury.

“I’ve jumped the highest I have since 2008,” he says. “This year will be the third year of my four-year cycle. The intensity is going to ramp up a little bit. I’ll start fine-tuning some things. It’s back on the up-and-up. I think I’ve got some good years left in me. And, The Right Stuff is unique in the way it really helps me to meet my hydration needs

Serious Cramper, Adventure Racer, shares his NASA-developed solution

Serious Cramper, Adventure Racer, shares his NASA-developed solution

Barry Nobles 2014-Barry-Nobles-Profile-Photo-300x225considers himself a nerd at work and at play. He works on legislation and strategic planning at the Coast Guard headquarters in Washington, D.C. In his spare time, he’s into Adventure Racing. [Editors Note: Adventure Racing is one of the faster growing endurance sports in the US with over 50,000 competitors annually leading up to National Championships]

What is Adventure Racing?

usara2“It’s kind of this nerdy cross section of the sports world,” Nobles explains. “It’s kind of like a triathlon, except you’re on a team and you have a map and a compass. You have to figure your way from checkpoint to checkpoint to checkpoint to checkpoint – on foot, mountain back, paddling, climbing. You’ve got to figure out how to get from place to place.”  [Editors Note: Learn more at USARA – US Adventure Racing Assn.]

Nobles loves the sport but was hampered by cramping, a family condition shared by his sister, father, and grandfather. “I come from a proud line of crampers, he jokes, but his teammates were exasperated by the interruptions every few hours. “Nobody wants a teammate who’s standing there locked up and can’t move. I’d be a liability to my teammates” One teammate recommended The Right Stuff (NASA-developed zero carb, electrolyte drink additive), and Nobles tried it first at a mountain bike race, the Shenandoah Mountain 100.

I started taking The Right Stuff. I made it through the whole race and didn’t cramp once. Now I’m in love with the stuff.

“That was the first time I actually used it for an event,” he says. “I’ve attempted that race three times. The first two times, before I was even halfway there, I completely locked up, around Mile 45. Last year, I started taking The Right Stuff. I made it through the whole race and didn’t cramp once. Now I’m in love with the stuff. I have teammates in love with the stuff, too.”

Nobles uses The Right Stuff at least weekly. “That is my drug of choice,” he says. “If I’m going over an hour, that’s when I use it. I train pretty hard. I’ve been doing a lot of racing lately.” He participated in the Krispy Kreme Challenge, a charity race from the N.C. State University campus to a downtown Raleigh doughnut shop several miles away where runners consume a dozen doughnuts before racing back, all in less than an hour.

Nobles recalls a 24-hour adventure race where a friend cramped and lay on the ground in the woods while others tried to massage his legs. “That’s not a good way to win a race,” he says. “He definitely would benefit from The Right Stuff.”

NASA-developed Hydration Aid Helping Soldiers in Hot Climates

NASA-developed Hydration Aid Helping Soldiers in Hot Climates

The Right Stuff, NASA-developed electrolyte drink additive was originally created for our astronauts and now used by high-exertion athletes from football players to triathletes, is helping U.S. troops stay strong in high-temperature locations where they are deployed.TRS_LOGO_dbl drop w ™ jpeg

Keeping Our Troops Hydrated

Donations of the product by Colorado-based Wellness Brands Inc. are coordinated through Operation Troop Aid of Tennessee, a decade-old nonprofit committed to providing care packages and bill payment assistance to soldiers of all military branches.

“The Right Stuff is made for such intense athletes,” says Mark Woods, founder of Operation Troop Aid. “These troops are in harm’s way in a very hot environment, so keeping their hydration up is critical to their performance. It makes a lot of sense.”

Woods established Operation Troop Aid after he helped manage the nationally-televised Garth Brooks performance after 9/11 on the U.S.S. Enterprise, where he was stationed.

The organization, which partners with fairs, festivals, shows, and other events, has distributed more than $6 million worth of products. Sponsors range from restaurants and jewelers to radio stations, a popcorn producer, and a chocolatier.

David Belaga, CEO of Wellness Brands, contacted Woods when he heard about the initiative three years ago. Since the first donation, included in care packages, Wellness Brands has shipped The Right Stuff directly to troop stations for distribution to the units.

We’re grateful to Operation Troop Aid for making possible this way to serve and support our troops.

A wide cross-section of athletes from High Schools and Colleges to Pro teams (NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL etc.) and Olympians use The Right Stuff for training and competition.   “Athletes, firefighters, construction workers, and others who do strenuous labor in hot and humid conditions are benefiting from this product.” Belaga says. “We’re grateful to Operation Troop Aid for making possible this way to serve and support our troops.”

The Right Stuff from NASA is a prepackaged, electrolyte, liquid drink additive that goes instantly into solution when added to at least 16 ounces of water. The formula combats cramps, headaches and the other symptoms of dehydration; protects the body from overheating both in times of intense exertion as well as in high heat settings; and increases endurance over 20 percent more than any other NASA-tested formula. Plus, NASA studies show that the formula also offsets the negative effects of jet lag and high altitude.  Learn more at www.TheRightStuff-USA.com

Pro Hockey (AHL) Athletic Trainer Saves “Heavy-Sweater” Goalie from Dehydration Symptoms

kevin-kacerKevin Kacer chose to attend Indiana Central University, now the University of Indianapolis, because he figured he’d get more experience as a student athletic trainer at the small school. He was right.

“I was the only student trainer there my freshman year,” says Kacer, who had seen programs with dozens of students at Purdue University and Indiana University. “It was a small Division 2 school. I knew I would get a lot of experience early in my collegiate career. I was traveling with the football team, I had the baseball team, I did wrestling and basketball.

I wanted to be an athletic trainer

“I knew when I was in high school that I wanted to be an athletic trainer,” he says, adding that his high school coach and athletic director sent him to summer camps for trainers. “I played sports growing up. I came to that realization that I wasn’t going to go much further playing sports, but I liked it and I liked helping people.”

Kacer earned his degree in physical education and, with his extensive experience, passed a national exam to become an athletic traChicago Wolves Logo croppediner. The head athletic trainer at the university, who had moved to Fort Wayne and opened a sports medicine clinic, helped Kacer get a job with the Fort Wayne Flames pro indoor soccer team. After two years, he moved to the Fort Wayne Komets of the International Hockey League, then the Fort Wayne Fury of the Continental Basketball Association. After two years as an assistant trainer with the Detroit Pistons, Kacer moved in 1995 to the Chicago Wolves of the American Hockey League, where he is head athletic trainer.

“I have everything to do with the health and safety of the players,” he says. “I manage all of their injuries. I’m the guy that takes care of their first aid needs, emergency needs. I’m that first responder when something happens to one of our players. Their health and safety is my No. 1 concern. I’m doing what I wanted to do.” Kacer is a member of the Professional Hockey Athletic Trainers Society (PHATS) , National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA), and American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

I’ve grown to use The Right Stuff for a lot more of my guys that are chronic sweaters.

A few years ago, he suggested The Right Stuff to a goalie who is a heavy sweater. “And, now he uses it religiously,” Kacer says. “He loses a lot of water weight both in practice and in games. It became a problem with him, getting dehydrated and losing that edge.  (Editor’s Note: Studies show hockey players are some of the heaviest sweaters among team sports athletes; e.g., 3+ L/game) .  I’ve grown to use The Right Stuff for a lot more of my guys that are chronic sweaters. They get overheated and lose that edge. It’s a very, very physical, demanding sport. Our games are usually two plus hours. It’s a pretty good aerobic sport.  The Right Stuff has been helping our team for a few years now!”