National Champion High Jumper Set the Bar High!

National Champion High Jumper Set the Bar High!

Dusty Jonas USA over barNearly two decades ago, when Dusty Jonas was in grade school in Texas, he tried a variety of sports through CYO (Catholic Youth Organization) before he focused on the high jump in track.

“I started pretty young playing a lot of different sports,” he says. I had my first track meet, which down there we did it through CYO. I did soccer, basketball, track. At that age, 9 or 10, I wasn’t particularly good at any of them but I wasn’t bad either. I dropped soccer – too much running for me. I’ve been high jumping since then. I didn’t really get to an elite level until high school,” where he improved nearly a foot – from 6 feet 2 inches to 7 feet 1 inch – between his sophomore and junior years.Nebraska Cornhuskers

Jonas won a national championship with the University of Nebraska and made the U.S. Olympic Team as a high jumper in 2008 (Beijing) but sat out 2102 with an Achilles tendon injury. Now he is aiming for a spot on the U.S. 2016 Olympics.

Aiming for the U.S. 2016 Olympics

“They say the prime age for a high jumper is 28 to 30,” Jonas says. “I’m right in that right now. I feel good. I’m starting to really feel confident in what I’m able to do. Strength levels are good.”

Jonas has volunteered as a track coach at the University of Nebraska for the past five years, drawing on his own experience to help others as he adopts a final-year training regimen for his own Olympic hopes.

Dusty Jonas going over the bar“I started as a long and triple jump coach,” he says, “I did high jump, long jump, and triple jump in college. I really enjoy the vertical jumps as well. As a developing coach that really wants to learn, you want to have a broad knowledge of all the events. This year I’m working with my high jumpers and working with the men’s short sprints and hurdles. We’ve got a really good squad.”

A nutritionist at the University of Nebraska introduced Jonas to The Right Stuff early in 2014.

I get less muscle soreness and I feel a lot better hydrated during my workouts

“I got my hands on it from being around here,” he says. “I notice that during my training, especially days when I am running, days when it is hot, I get less muscle soreness I feel a lot better hydrated during my workouts.”

Jonas has already jumped 7 feet 8.5 inches this year, close to a personal best and a sign of successful rehab after his injury.

“I’ve jumped the highest I have since 2008,” he says. “This year will be the third year of my four-year cycle. The intensity is going to ramp up a little bit. I’ll start fine-tuning some things. It’s back on the up-and-up. I think I’ve got some good years left in me. And, The Right Stuff is unique in the way it really helps me to meet my hydration needs

Competing and Continuing Education Drive the University of Nebraska Sports Nutrition Director

Competing and Continuing Education Drive the University of Nebraska Sports Nutrition Director

Lindsey Remmers was playing volleyball and majoring in nutrition at Winthrop University when she Lindsey Remmers Nebraskaasked a professor about career possibilities that combine sports and nutrition. “I asked him about jobs, and he said there’s nothing, really,” she recalls. Today, Remmers is Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Nebraska.Nebraska

“I didn’t know it existed until I went online and randomly looked to see if Nebraska had a dietitian, and they did,” she said, adding that about a dozen schools had such positions in 2005 and more than 70 have them now. “It’s grown a lot.”

Remmers, who was a volunteer assistant responsible for meals and travel for the team in her fifth year at Winthrop, worked for James Harris at Nebraska, where he taught her the science of hydration and the role of nutrition in athletes’ recovery. Her job includes answering questions and giving brief talks at workouts, organizing meals for home and away games, providing one-on-one advice, leading a freshman orientation on sports nutrition, giving grocery store tours, and administrative tasks.

Although players miss their pizza and French fries, she says, they appreciate the positive impact on their performance. “It’s all for good – to make them leaner, stronger, faster,” Remmers says. “That’s the motivation for them – to become a better athlete. You’re going to get out what you put in. That goes for training and eating.”

Remmers maintains her own health by running, completing Tough Mudder obstacle races and preparing for a marathon. “I like to stay active,” she says. “When you have a race or competition, it gives you something to train for. It gives me a reason to exercise.” kiwi-packet-group2

She uses The Right Stuff to maintain her own hydration and encourages athletes to use it too.
I never do a long run without it and I find that I don’t have to drink as much water.

 

“The Right Stuff allows athletes go harder, longer,” she says. “When you’re dehydrated and fatigued, you’re at high risk for injury. I never do a long run without it and I find that I don’t have to drink as much water.”

Remmers hopes the Sports Dietitian field grows to provide a staff dietitian for every 100 athletes to provide more individualized programs. “There’s going to be a lot more specialized sports nutrition,” she says. “There’s all kinds of science coming out.”

Remmers has already seen dramatic changes in sports nutrition awareness since her college days. “We were starving during practice,” she says, recalling pleas to the coach for snacks. “You don’t think about bringing stuff and there was nothing there available. Now at Nebraska, we have fueling stations where they can grab a snack before practice if they need it.”