A Different Perspective for Athletes to Consider: Don’t Ice for Recovery

A Different Perspective for Athletes to Consider: Don’t Ice for Recovery

gary-reinlDistance runner Gary Reinl’s meticulous reporting destroyed the long-held practice of rest and ice for healing injuries, restoring the natural course of healing by the inflammatory response assisted by muscle activation – the intuitive “walk it off” order of coaches in his childhood. His insistence on scientific evidence also makes him a user and advocate of The Right Stuff hydration formula developed by NASA.

Reinl, 63, who started running in the 1960s on water and sometimes salt tablets, remembers a nearly 70-mile run from Philadelphia to Ocean City, N.J., in the summer of 1971 wearing Converse sneakers and sipping water from front-yard hoses on the route.

“Everything we did was wrong,” he says. “I’ve done it wrong, and I’ve done it right, and I’m certain that doing it right is way better.”

icedWhen it comes to treating injuries, doing it right is the opposite of conventional wisdom that held sway for decades under the popular acronym RICE – Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Reinl’s relentless research found support for the approach, and Dr. Gabe Mirkin, who coined the term in 1978, recanted in the foreword to Reinl’s 2014 book Iced! The Illusionary Treatment Option.

Shifting the Conversation

“We have begun to shift the conversation. We’re shifting it to muscle activation to solve the problem,” says Reinl, who represents an electro-muscle stimulation device, MARC PRO® (Muscle Activated Recovery Cascade), that promotes muscle activation. “Why would you put ice on damaged tissue? People believe it reduces swelling. It doesn’t reduce swelling. It actually increases swelling. Your immune system knows how to handle it. That’s why it sends fluid to the damaged area. Why would you try to reduce the amount of fluid sent to the damaged site?”

Ice slows the natural repair process by shutting off signals between muscles and nerves. Inflammation is a necessary part of the healing process as the body rushes blood and nutrients to the area, and muscle activation helps flush out the extra fluids through the lymphatic system. “The last thing you’d want to do is restrict swelling coming to the area,” Reinl says. “You do want the fluid to come. What you don’t want it to do is accumulate and settle.”

In fact, the delay caused by icing can suffocate healthy cells that would not have died as a result of the injury, a secondary cellular death that Reinl calls “negligent homicide.”

Reinl traced the origins of the “Ice Age” to 1962, when a physician successfully reattached the arm, preserved on ice, of a 12-year-old who was injured while jumping a train in Massachusetts. The story became a sensation, and people mistakenly associated ice with healing. “The intent of putting the severed body arm on ice was to preserve the severed body part,” he explains. “It had nothing to do with damaged tissue; it had to do with managing a severed body part.”

The RICE Approach

riceAfter Mirkin published his RICE approach in 1978, soccer moms everywhere kept nifty snap-and-chill ice packs in their pocketbooks. Athletic trainers, who became common on sports teams in the 1980s, could not perform medical procedures but could legally apply ice. Even after Medicare, recognizing the lack of evidence, stopped reimbursing for ice treatments in physical therapy clinics, the practice thrived in sports.

Reinl has worked with athletic trainers and physical therapists from more than 80 professional teams and other elite athletes who have stopped or reduced their use of ice, although some star athletes still insist on the old approach.

These days, Reinl, whose lifetime running total is above 50,000 miles, lives in the Las Vegas desert and routinely runs 10 miles through a canyon where temperatures can exceed 113 degrees. He preps with a pre-run dose of The Right Stuff and takes another packet for each hour on the road when he returns, ensuring that his body chemistry remains optimal for tissue regeneration and recovery.

“You know how good you feel from it,” he says, adding that his son, a lawyer, rejects all otherright-stuff supplements but adopts The Right Stuff regimen. “I can go out and run 20 in the desert and I’m perfectly fine. I carry a couple of gallons of water with me. I stay fully hydrated on my runs.”

He recommends The Right Stuff to runners, endurance athletes, military personnel, and even golfers who spend long hours in the hot sun. You can check out the science behind The Right Stuff.        [Editors Note: links to NASA studies can be found on the brand’s website at http://tiny.cc/TheRightStuffStudies]

“Any elites I talk to, I say just look around and look at how people are trying to solve the problem,” Reinl says. “Look at the science behind The Right Stuff.  It improves muscle function. It improves your physiology. It improves muscle activation. It feels good. Every edge counts.”

 

Pro Tennis Player Saves Himself from Dehydration and Credits NASA

Pro Tennis Player Saves Himself from Dehydration and Credits NASA

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tim-kpulunTim Kpulun was wilting in the Florida heat and humidity, about to run out of energy in the four-hour match, out of all his usual supplements to keep his body in balance, when he remembered the packs of The Right Stuff that a friend had given him. He took the NASA-developed hydration drink additive, called The Right Stuff® for the first time. He felt the power return, and went on to win the match.

I tried The Right Stuff and I felt and saw a difference

“I tried The Right Stuff and I felt and saw a difference,” he recalls. “It is this thing that rejuvenated me. I came through a really difficult match. My body was calm. It wasn’t my fitness that got me through. It is this thing that rejuvenated me. I felt like I came alive.”

Tennis is Life

concordiaFor Tim Kpulun, who grew up in London, started playing tennis at age 7, attended Concordia University in Irvine, Calif., and went pro after his college success, tennis is life. At his parents’ urging in his youth, he switched from playing both soccer and tennis to concentrating on the individual sport. At Concordia, he lost only three matches in three years and realized he could pursue a career.

“There was a year where I went the whole season and I lost one match,” he recalls. “To do this is not easy. I thought, ‘I must be doing something correct. After I’m done, I’m going to give it a shot, put everything into tennis. I am a better tennis player than I was, that’s for sure. It’s made me a better competitor, a better athlete. It turned out to be life-changing I have grown as a person. This sport has designed me. The life that you have is all around this. It’s in your blood. It’s what you do.”

Living in Southern California, Kpulun relates to numerous leading coaches for advice about his game. He has ranked as high as 622; his ranking has dipped to around 800, but he is redoubling his focus and expects to advance quickly. At that level, matches are often in difficult venues and climates where matches don’t stop when the temperature reaches 105 degrees or more. Later this year, for example, Kpulun plans to travel to Cambodia.

“Some of the tournaments we play, they’re not in pleasant places,” he says, adding that The Right Stuff helps him succeed in such environments. “You have no choice. You’ve got to deal with the conditions. Everything there is to test your physicality. You need something to keep you. You need the best thing for you.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

“I need this thing to survive those climates. I love Florida, but it’s humid – you’re sweating eating lunch, you’re dehydrated maybe in your sleep. I’m in ridiculously good shape, but it doesn’t matter what shape you’re in – if you don’t have the right thing in your body, you will break. For the conditions we play in, The Right Stuff®has been the best thing by a mile.” [Editor’s Note: Learn more at www.TheRightStuff-USA.com ]

Introducing New All-Natural Lemonade The Right Stuff® Hydration from NASA

Introducing New All-Natural Lemonade The Right Stuff® Hydration from NASA

lemonade pouch 10-15New The Right Stuff® Lemonade is a new flavor of the same highly effective NASA-developed, blend of electrolytes, which as always, contains no carbohydrates. This new variety is sweetened with all-natural Stevia and like all the other flavors, is NSF Certified for Sport.

Based on numerous published studies (links can be found here on our website), The Right Stuff is far superior to any other NASA-tested formula for:

  • Combating the cramps, muscle fatigue, light-headedness and headaches caused by heavy sweating, dehydration and electrolyte loss
  • Increasing endurance by over 20% or more than any other NASA-tested formula
  • Improving core thermoregulation;protecting athletes’ bodies from overheating during times of intense exertion and in high heat settings

All versions of The Right Stuff are NSF-Certified for Sport and so are clear from all banned substances, heavy metals and contaminants.

High Schools and Colleges across the U.S., numerous pro teams (NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL and MLS) and Olympians along with first responders (firefighters, military) and industrial workers (construction and paving crews, roofers, parcel delivery etc.) all have integrated The Right Stuff into their training and event-day regimens.

Additionally, the NASA studies show thlemonadeat the formula is also a powerful aid for fighting the negative effects caused by Jet Lag and high altitude

To learn more:

Visit www.TheRightStuff-USA.com

Call 720-684-6584
Or
Click here to visit our Facebook Fan Page

NHL Head Athletic Trainer shares the solution to hydration challenges even in the cold of the hockey rink

NHL Head Athletic Trainer shares the solution to hydration challenges even in the cold of the hockey rink

Like any hockey player growing up in the Detroit area, Piet Van Zant dreamed of playing with the National Hockey League (NHL) Detroit Red Wings. An injury that sidelined him in high school put him on a career path that led to the Red Wings organization more 20 years ago. He’s now the Head Athletic Trainer.Piet Van Zant

“You want to play for your hometown team,” says Van Zant, who was introduced to athletic training after his injury. “Once I started in the program, it was definitely something I knew I wanted to do as a career.”

After he graduated from Central Michigan University with a bachelor’s degree in athletic training in 1993, Van Zant went to work for the minor league Adirondack Red Wings. After six years, he was added to the Detroit Red Wings medical staff as an Assistant Trainer, and he became Head Trainer in 2002. He earned a master’s degree in Performance Enhancement in 2004 just as emphasis on sports training and nutrition was accelerating.

Boosting health, safety, and performance

“Over the years, it’s definitely become a more evidence-based practice for athletic trainers and anybody in the medical field when it comes to pro sports and pro athletes,” Van Zant says. “You need to have research and proof that your treatments and your therapies you’re doing with athletes actually work.”

Red Wings HockeySince Van Zant joined the Red Wings, the organization has added a nutritionist, strength coach, a physical therapist, and two massage therapists, with access for players to acupuncture, chiropractic, and other strategies to boost their health, safety, and performance. The Nutritionist introduced him to The Right Stuff a few years ago.

Hydration is imperative in sports like hockey

“It started with a couple of problem players, and it’s evolved to a preventive strategy for multiple players,” he says. “Hydration is imperative in sports like hockey where you’re wearing equipment that weighs you down, that increases the heat. Your body’s not able to dissipate that heat as well as if you were in shorts and a t-shirt.”

Despite an environment cold enough to keep the rink frozen, Hi Res Hockey Goalie croppedthe intensity and length of hockey events – some 3½ hours – in heavy equipment can cause sweating that disrupts sodium and electrolyte balance. In one extreme case, Van Zant say, a goalie lost 15 pounds in a single game.

Just plain water over that time frame isn’t going to cut it,” he says. “It is crucial to maintain that balance. The Right Stuff helps us do that.”

Competing and Continuing Education Drive the University of Nebraska Sports Nutrition Director

Competing and Continuing Education Drive the University of Nebraska Sports Nutrition Director

Lindsey Remmers was playing volleyball and majoring in nutrition at Winthrop University when she Lindsey Remmers Nebraskaasked a professor about career possibilities that combine sports and nutrition. “I asked him about jobs, and he said there’s nothing, really,” she recalls. Today, Remmers is Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Nebraska.Nebraska

“I didn’t know it existed until I went online and randomly looked to see if Nebraska had a dietitian, and they did,” she said, adding that about a dozen schools had such positions in 2005 and more than 70 have them now. “It’s grown a lot.”

Remmers, who was a volunteer assistant responsible for meals and travel for the team in her fifth year at Winthrop, worked for James Harris at Nebraska, where he taught her the science of hydration and the role of nutrition in athletes’ recovery. Her job includes answering questions and giving brief talks at workouts, organizing meals for home and away games, providing one-on-one advice, leading a freshman orientation on sports nutrition, giving grocery store tours, and administrative tasks.

Although players miss their pizza and French fries, she says, they appreciate the positive impact on their performance. “It’s all for good – to make them leaner, stronger, faster,” Remmers says. “That’s the motivation for them – to become a better athlete. You’re going to get out what you put in. That goes for training and eating.”

Remmers maintains her own health by running, completing Tough Mudder obstacle races and preparing for a marathon. “I like to stay active,” she says. “When you have a race or competition, it gives you something to train for. It gives me a reason to exercise.” kiwi-packet-group2

She uses The Right Stuff to maintain her own hydration and encourages athletes to use it too.
I never do a long run without it and I find that I don’t have to drink as much water.

 

“The Right Stuff allows athletes go harder, longer,” she says. “When you’re dehydrated and fatigued, you’re at high risk for injury. I never do a long run without it and I find that I don’t have to drink as much water.”

Remmers hopes the Sports Dietitian field grows to provide a staff dietitian for every 100 athletes to provide more individualized programs. “There’s going to be a lot more specialized sports nutrition,” she says. “There’s all kinds of science coming out.”

Remmers has already seen dramatic changes in sports nutrition awareness since her college days. “We were starving during practice,” she says, recalling pleas to the coach for snacks. “You don’t think about bringing stuff and there was nothing there available. Now at Nebraska, we have fueling stations where they can grab a snack before practice if they need it.”

 

What Can This NASCAR Driver Teach You About Optimal Hydration?

Michael Mcdowell - The Right StuffAfter racecar driver Michael McDowell switched to NASCAR from sports cars and Indy cars in 2007, he suffered extreme dehydration on a track in Virginia and went looking for a solution.

“I was doing a lot of research and trying to find out how to stay hydrated,” says McDowell, a Phoenix-area native who moved to Charlotte in 2004. “At the time, I was losing anywhere from 8 to 10 pounds per race of water during the race itself. I was trying to figure out a way to stay hydrated. You’re in the car four or five hours. It’s 110 to 130 degrees inside the car. Obviously, in our sport, hydration is key.”

When driving around the track at over 150 mph, reaction time is critical. Proper hydration is essential to maintain that continuous, nearly instantaneous response timing.

He first learned about The Right Stuff® when he was at an event with former NASA Space Shuttle Pilot Bill Gregory who uses it for his endurance training. Bill is an enthusiastic user of The Right Stuff who even joined the Board of Wellness Brands, makers of The Right Stuff. Since McDowell found The Right Stuff three years ago, he has cut his water consumption during races by half, from 64 to 32 ounces.

The Advantage

“I feel like it gives me an advantage,” he says. “During the race weekends, I will take it within an hour leading up to the race. Then, in the middle of the race I’ll take one as well. I just mix it in the water and have it in the car with me. It works well. One of the main reasons I continue to use it is because I simply don’t lose as much water throughout the event, so I don’t have to rehydrate as much. I’m not losing as much, which is ideal for me.”

One of the main reasons I continue to use it is because I simply don’t lose as much water throughout the event, so I don’t have to rehydrate as much

McDowell also turns to The Right Stuff when he’s involved in other sweaty sports, such as when he competes in triathlons.

“For me, I take it when I know I’m going to do something that’s going to be extreme and long-lasting,” he says. “I use it for all of those extreme conditions.”

The Right Stuff – USA

So this is David Belaga talking to you from Kansas City at the CSCCA Convention about The Right Stuff which is a NASA hydration formula. It was developed because the astronauts suffered severe dehydration when they come back into the gravity of earth and as NASA likes to do they spent over a decade conducting dozens of clinical studies to refine and optimize the formula and the resulting formula, The Right Stuff, significantly outperformed every other product tested in three critical ways:
1. It does a much better job fighting the symptoms of dehydration via cramps, headaches, muscle fatigue, ect.
2. It was also shown to improve core thermo-regulation. So it protects the body from overheating both in times of high exertion and in high heat settings.
3. And then it was also shown to imcrease athletic endurance by over 20% more than any other product tested by NASA so you aren’t talking small increments, you’re talking significant improvments.
For more information, go to www.therightstuff-usa.com.

Scott Tietzel – Pro Cyclist – On The Right Stuff

Pro Cyclist (Team Specialized), 2011 Leadville 100; 11-place finish overall and #1 finish in age group 20-29

Scott Tietzel, pro cyclist, has raced in the “Bailey Hundo” competition. A 100 mi race designed for endurance cyclist with 12,740 ft of climbing terrain.
On June 16 2012, Scott set a course record of 6 hrs 28:55 minutes.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qh_HjP1PcNA]

One of the main issues I had with endurance cycling was cramping and so the high sodium content / electrolyte balance really was a great advantage for me.

I use it before to prehydrate before a big event. I’ll do that the day before, the morning before an event, then I will also use it during an event. If I have a long race, I will get bottles at the feed zone so that I am hydrating during an event and then after a big effort, six or seven hours on the bike. Even if you are drinking as much as you can you are going to be dehydrated, so I use The Right Stuff afterwards as well.

Last year in Leadville, five hours into the race I was really starting to hit the wall and I had a bottle with The Right Stuff in there and I was able to finish up strong and I was actually able to pass up some guys that were in the same spot that I was earlier and without a doubt it was because of The Right Stuff.

5 Tips To Maximize Your Training

With the arrival of spring, you can see them all over. In brightly-colored clothes in suburban areas, weaving in and out of pedestrians under the watchful gaze of skyscrapers or on solitary bike trails early in the morning. Spring heralds the time of year when endurance athletes comes out of the winter months to begin training for the long-awaited races.

The Country Music Marathon, The Badwater Ultramarathon, The Race Across America and your local 10K or half-marathon race for charity in your neck of the woods all mean one thing to the endurance athlete – training.
Whether for the fun of it or the competition, maximizing your experience in event training is of utmost importance. Proper training will benefit the endurance athlete to help avoid physical injury either before, during or after the competition.

Here are a some well-recognized tips to consider when training:

1. Do not overtrain – although this may seem like a good idea, overtraining can actually damage your body faster. Oftentimes, endurance athletes feel as though their training regimen is not effective enough and so they train harder. This can be the root of overtraining. Although training or exercise is the root to strong competition. It is the proper rest after the exercise that makes an endurance athlete fit. A great aid for balanced training is to keep a log. Your log should show elevated training periods over a long period of time as your body begins to strengthen and adjust to your regimen.

2.  Pay attention to Injuries, especially seemingly minor injuries – nearly every athlete will injure themselves to some degree, either during training or during the competition. The relative impact of how that injury effects you during competition is determined by your responding quickly. This requires that you understand how your body responds to certain stimuli. Know your gait, your stride, your breathing patterns. Understanding your body on this level will allow you to catch injuries as early as possible and can help protect you from exacerbating the injury.

3. Cross Train – Although many athletes believe that total focus on their single sport (e.g., running) may be the best course of action, The American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine encourages cross training as the ‘total body tune-up, something that can not be achieved if an athlete concentrates on just one type of activity.’ And it is notable that it goes on to say that cross training may help the athlete “experience fewer overuse injuries”.

4.  Train Carefully and Thoughtfully – An athletes training for an endurance race, be it cycling, a marathon or a triathlon – needs to begin months in advance. This will begin to prepare your body for the task it will undertake. This training is not only a physical effort but, as importantly, a mental one. Endurance competition begins before the proverbial rubber ever meets the road. It begins in the mind. Set goals for yourself and fully develop the mental aspect of how you will, and did, accomplish that goal.   As you train, listen to your body to determine what works best for you. Keep a log of how long you trained, which types of exercise you did, what you ate and don’t forget to also log your fluid intake.

5.  Nutrition and Hydration – If you speak with the most every elite athlete, they will quickly let you know that it is not only critical to train your body through exercise but it is equally important to take care of yourself on the inside too.  The foods you eat (macro-nutrients; carbs, protein and fat) are essential to a successful training program.  Be sure to eat a healthy and varied diet (cross-train your digestion system too)!  And, especially as we head into the warmer months, be sure to hydrate.  But remember, water alone may not be enough.  When you train in excess of an hour your body can excrete grams of electrolytes (e.g. sodium and chloride) through your sweat.  You need to replenish those too.  Doing so will provide you the best recipe for success for your body.

The Right Stuff – NASA Tested, Athlete Approved

In 2009, when the NASA-developed hydration drink additive, The Right Stuff® was first introduced for endurance athletes; there were sceptics who did not foresee market success.  For example, according to the editors from Popular Science magazine, “Coming out with a product whose only market is already dominated by Gatorade® does not sound like the beginnings of a successful business venture.”  But the market has proven otherwise as The Right Stuff® continues to grow rapidly year after year.
We are pleased to continually demonstrate the success of The Right Stuff as a hydration additive for performance athletes. The Right Stuff will soon begin its 5th year on the market and is the exclusive provider for hydration needs of high performance athletes such as

Athletes such as these and many others have found The Right Stuff makes a noticeable, positive impact on their performance. “Companies always claim they sell the best product, but after training here on our local trails, we realized how big of an impact The Right Stuff has on our bodies.” – Texas A&M International (TAMIU) Cycling Club

Since its introduction to the public, The Right Stuff has continued to work to improve the product’s flavors for the athletes who depend on The Right Stuff for their hydration needs. The Right Stuff® recently introduced a new Orange Tangerine flavor that is especially well-liked among the power athletes (e.g., Baseball, Football, Soccer, Hockey etc.)
We invite you to visit us at www.therightstuff-usa.com to learn more.   Or, contact us at custsvc@wellness-brands.com or call 720-684-6584